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Lactase non-persistence as a determinant of milk avoidance and calcium intake in children and adolescents

  • Ricardo Almon (a1), Michael Sjöström (a2) and Torbjörn K. Nilsson (a3) (a4)
Abstract

This study examines if lactase non-persistent (LNP) children and adolescents differ from those who are lactase persistent (LP) as regards milk avoidance and Ca intake. We also studied potential differences in anthropometric features related to obesity, and examined if milk avoidance is associated with lactase-persistence status. Additionally, we aimed to determine if heterozygous subjects showed an intermediary phenotype as regards Ca intake. Furthermore, we tested if LP and LNP influence vitamin D intake. The European Youth Heart Study is an ongoing international, multi-centre cohort study primarily designed to address CVD risk factors. Children (n 298, mean age 9·6 years) and adolescents (n 386, mean age 15·6 years) belonging to the Swedish part of the European Youth Heart Study were genotyped for the LCT-13910 C > T polymorphism. Mendelian randomisation was used. Milk avoidance was significantly more common in LNP adolescents (OR 3·2; 95% CI 1·5, 7·3). LP subjects had higher milk consumption (P < 0·001). Accordingly, energy consumption derived from milk and Ca intake was lower in LNP (P < 0·05 and P < 0·001, respectively). Heterozygous subjects did not show an intermediary phenotype concerning milk consumption. LP or LNP status did not affect vitamin D intake or anthropometric variables. LNP in children and adolescents is associated with reduced intake of milk and some milk-product-related nutritional components, in particular Ca. This reduced intake did not affect the studied anthropometric variables, indicators of body fat or estimated vitamin D intake. However, independently of genotype, age and sex, daily vitamin D intake was below the recommended intakes. Milk avoidance among adolescents but not children was associated with LNP.

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Copyright
The online version of this article is published within an Open Access environment subject to the conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike licence . The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use.
Corresponding author
* Corresponding author: Dr. R. Almon, fax + 46 19 6025797, email ricardo.almon@med.lu.se
References
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Journal of Nutritional Science
  • ISSN: 2048-6790
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