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Intra- and interspecific variation in internal structures of the genus Stenosarina (Brachiopoda, Terebratulida) using landmarks

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 July 2015

A. Tort
Affiliation:
Université de Bourgogne, 6 boulevard Gabriel, F-21000 Dijon, France,
B. Laurin
Affiliation:
Université de Bourgogne, 6 boulevard Gabriel, F-21000 Dijon, France,

Abstract

Although a number of brachiopod genera have been defined mainly from their internal structures, the fixity of those structures has rarely been investigated. Variability of the rather simple loops of two New Caledonian species of the Recent genus Stenosarina (Terebratulida), one species having a variant with endemic morphology, provides insight into the relationship between the two species. Procrustes methods based on landmarks are used. Intra-population variability is found to be of the same order of magnitude as inter-population variability. Moreover, the morphological distance between the endemic variant and the other specimens is greater than the distance between the two species of Stenosarina. The study also identifies a morphocline between the three forms of Stenosarina under study.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Paleontological Society 2001

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Intra- and interspecific variation in internal structures of the genus Stenosarina (Brachiopoda, Terebratulida) using landmarks
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Intra- and interspecific variation in internal structures of the genus Stenosarina (Brachiopoda, Terebratulida) using landmarks
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