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Comparing Online and Face-to-Face Student Counselling: What Therapeutic Goals Are Identified and What Are the Implications for Educational Providers?

  • Terry Hanley (a1), Zehra Ersahin (a2), Aaron Sefi (a3) and Judith Hebron (a4)

Abstract

Online counselling is increasingly being used as an alternative to face-to-face student counselling. Using an exploratory mixed methods design, this project investigated the practice by examining the types of therapeutic goals that 11- to 25-year-olds identify online in routine practice. These goals were then compared to goals identified in equivalent school and community-based counselling services; 1,137 online goals (expressed by 504 young people) and 221 face-to-face goals (expressed by 220 young people) were analysed for key themes using grounded theory techniques. This analysis identified three core categories: (1) Intrapersonal Goals, (2) Interpersonal Goals, and (3) Intrapersonal Goals Directly Related to Others. Further statistical analysis of these themes indicated that online and face-to-face services appear to be used in different ways by students. These differences are discussed alongside the implications for professionals working in educational settings.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

address for correspondence: Terry Hanley, Rm. A6.15, Ellen Wilkinson Building, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester, M13 9PL, UK. Email: terry.hanley@manchester.ac.uk

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Keywords

Comparing Online and Face-to-Face Student Counselling: What Therapeutic Goals Are Identified and What Are the Implications for Educational Providers?

  • Terry Hanley (a1), Zehra Ersahin (a2), Aaron Sefi (a3) and Judith Hebron (a4)

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