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The Impact of Masculinity on Anger Arousal in Ambiguous Situations

  • Michelle Wharton (a1), Andrew Day (a2), Philip Mohr (a3), Adam Gerace (a4) and Kevin Howells (a5)...

Abstract

This study aimed to investigate the influence of sex and gender role identity on anger experience at varying levels of provocation in a sample of 585 Australian students. Participants viewed videotaped vignettes of a potentially anger-triggering event where the intent of another person was either ambiguous or unambiguous. Measures of self-predicted anger, trait anger, and gender role identity were then completed. Results supported the hypothesis that it is gender role identity rather than sex that is more closely related to angry emotion. There was, however, no support for the hypothesis that anger arousal would be greater in circumstances in which the intention behind a provoking event is ambiguous when the respondent identifies with a masculine gender role. The implications of these findings for the development of anger management programs are discussed.

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Copyright

Corresponding author

ADDRESS FOR CORRESPONDENCE: Andrew Day, School of Psychology, Faculty of Health, Deakin University, Geelong Waterfront Campus, Geelong VIC 3320, Australia. Email: andrew.day@deakin.edu.au

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Journal of Relationships Research
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  • EISSN: 1838-0956
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