Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home

Community Integration in Traumatic Brain Injury: The Contributing Factor of Affect Recognition Deficits

  • Allison S. Binder (a1), Katie Lancaster (a2) (a3), Jean Lengenfelder (a2) (a3), Nancy D. Chiaravalloti (a2) (a3) and Helen M. Genova (a2) (a3)...

Abstract

Objective: Individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI) can experience social isolation, which is damaging to well-being and counterproductive to successful rehabilitation. It has been proposed that social cognitive deficits that commonly result from TBI may contribute to weakened social integration. However, the consequences of specific social cognitive deficits in TBI are still being delineated. The current work sought to better characterize the relationship between community integration and facial affect recognition (FAR) in TBI. Participants and Methods: A total of 27 participants with moderate to severe TBI and 30 healthy controls (HCs) completed two tests of FAR, which employed either static photographic stimuli or dynamic video stimuli (The Awareness of Social Inference Test). The Community Integration Questionnaire was also administered to participants. Results: Participants with TBI were significantly impaired on both the static and dynamic FAR measures, yet the deficits were most pronounced within the dynamic task. Furthermore, participants with TBI reported lower community integration compared with HCs. FAR was positively associated with community integration in both groups, such that participants with proficient affect recognition skills were better integrated into their communities. Conclusions: FAR deficits may contribute to the lack of community integration often observed in TBI; thus, interventions designed to improve FAR may be beneficial to this population’s ability to successfully reintegrate into society.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Community Integration in Traumatic Brain Injury: The Contributing Factor of Affect Recognition Deficits
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Community Integration in Traumatic Brain Injury: The Contributing Factor of Affect Recognition Deficits
      Available formats
      ×

      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Community Integration in Traumatic Brain Injury: The Contributing Factor of Affect Recognition Deficits
      Available formats
      ×

Copyright

Corresponding author

Correspondence and reprint requests to: Helen M. Genova, 120 Eagle Rock Avenue, Suite 100, East Hanover, NJ, USA. E-mail: hgenova@KesslerFoundation.org

Footnotes

Hide All

Equally contributing authors.

Footnotes

References

Hide All
Babbage, D.R., Yim, J., Zupan, B., Neumann, D., Tomita, M.R., & Willer, B. (2011). Meta-analysis of facial affect recognition difficulties after traumatic brain injury. Neuropsychology, 25(3), 277.
Benjamini, Y. & Hochberg, Y. (1995). Controlling the false discovery rate: A practical and powerful approach to multiple testing. Journal of the Royal Statistical Society. Series B (Methodological). Wiley Royal Statistical Society. doi: 10.2307/2346101.
Cicerone, K.D., Mott, T., Azulay, J., & Friel, J.C. (2004). Community integration and satisfaction with functioning after intensive cognitive rehabilitation for traumatic brain injury. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 85(6), 943950. doi: 10.1016/j.apmr.2003.07.019.
Delis, D., Dean, C., Kramer, J.H., Kaplan, E., Ober, B. (2000). California verbal learning test, second edition (CVLT-II). San Antonie, TX: Psychological Corporation.
Doninger, N.A., Heinemann, A.W., Bode, R.K., Sokol, K., Corrigan, J.D., & Moore, D. (2003). Predicting community integration following traumatic brain injury with health and cognitive status measures. Rehabilitation Psychology, 48(2), 67.
Genova, H.M., Lancaster, K., Lengenfelder, J., Bober, C.P., DeLuca, J., & Chiaravalloti, N.D. (in press). Relationship between social cognition and fatigue, depressive symptoms, and anxiety in multiple sclerosis. Journal of Neuropsychology.
Hoofien, D., Gilboa, A., Vakil, E., & Donovick, P.J. (2001). Traumatic brain injury (TBI) 10–20 years later: A comprehensive outcome study of psychiatric symptomatology, cognitive abilities and psychosocial functioning. Brain Injury, 15(3), 189209. doi: 10.1080/026990501300005659.
Izaute, M., Durozard, C., Aldigier, E., Teissedre, F., Perreve, A., & Gerbaud, L. (2008). Perceived social support and locus of control after a traumatic brain injury (TBI). Brain Injury, 22(10), 758764. doi: 10.1080/02699050802366002.
Juengst, S.B., Arenth, P.M., Raina, K.D., McCue, M., & Skidmore, E.R. (2014). Affective state and community integration after traumatic brain injury. American Journal of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, 93(12), 10861094. doi: 10.1097/PHM.0000000000000163.
Knox, L. & Douglas, J. (2009). Long-term ability to interpret facial expression after traumatic brain injury and its relation to social integration. Brain and Cognition, 69(2), 442449.
Malec, J.F., Brown, A.W., Leibson, C.L., Flaada, J.T., Mandrekar, J.N., Diehl, N.N., & Perkins, P.K. (2007). The Mayo classification system for traumatic brain injury severity. Journal of Neurotrauma, 24(9), 14171424. doi: 10.1089/neu.2006.0245.
May, M., Milders, M., Downey, B., Whyte, M., Higgins, V., Wojcik, Z., O’Rourke, S. (2017). Social behavior and impairments in social cognition following traumatic brain injury. Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society, 23(05), 400411. doi: 10.1017/S1355617717000182.
McDonald, S., Flanagan, S., Rollins, J., & Kinch, J. (2003). TASIT: A new clinical tool for assessing social perception after traumatic brain injury. The Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation, 18(3), 219238. doi: 10.1097/00001199-200305000-00001.
McDonald, S., & Saunders, J.C. (2005). Differential impairment in recognition of emotion across different media in people with severe traumatic brain injury. Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society, 11(4), 392399. doi: 10.1017/S1355617705050447.
Milders, M., Fuchs, S., & Crawford, J.R. (2003). Neuropsychological impairments and changes in emotional and social behaviour following severe traumatic brain injury. Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology (Neuropsychology, Development and Cognition: Section A), 25(2), 157172. doi: 10.1076/jcen.25.2.157.13642.
Morton, M.V., & Wehman, P. (1995). Psychosocial and emotional sequelae of individuals with traumatic brain injury: A literature review and recommendations. Brain Injury, 9(1), 8192. doi: 10.3109/02699059509004574.
Neumann, D., Babbage, D.R., Zupan, B., & Willer, B. (2015). A randomized controlled trial of emotion recognition training after traumatic brain injury. Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation, 30(3), E12E23. doi: 10.1097/HTR.0000000000000054.
Vanderploeg, R.D., Crowell, T.A., & Curtiss, G. (2001). Verbal learning and memory deficits in traumatic brain injury: encoding, consolidation, and retrieval. Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology, 23(2), 185195. doi: 10.1076/jcen.23.2.185.1210.
Willer, B., Rosenthal, M., Kreutzer, J.S., Gordon, W.A., & Rempel, R. (1993). Assessment of community integration following rehabilitation for traumatic brain injury. Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation, 8(2), 7587. doi: 10.1097/00001199-199308020-00009.

Keywords

Community Integration in Traumatic Brain Injury: The Contributing Factor of Affect Recognition Deficits

  • Allison S. Binder (a1), Katie Lancaster (a2) (a3), Jean Lengenfelder (a2) (a3), Nancy D. Chiaravalloti (a2) (a3) and Helen M. Genova (a2) (a3)...

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 0 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between <date>. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Usage data cannot currently be displayed