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Cicipu

  • Stuart McGill (a1)

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Cicipu ([tʃìtʃí], ISO 639–3 code awc) is spoken by approximately 20,000 people in northwest Nigeria, with the main language area straddling the boundary between Kebbi and Niger states. The language belongs to the Kambari subgroup (not Kamuku as stated by Lewis, Simons & Fennig 2013) of Kainji (Benue-Congo), although it is heavily influenced by the lingua franca Hausa, in which almost all speakers are fluent. There are several identifiable dialects, with native speakers of Cicipu generally listing seven. Of these, Tirisino is the most prestigious and least endangered dialect, and this is the one presented here. Tikumbasi is the most divergent of the dialects, with the /o/ vowel in the other dialects consistently corresponding to /e/ in Tikumbasi (for example /ː/ ‘hello’ ~ /ː/, /tʃìː/ ‘drum’ ~ /tʃìkʷéː/). The distinction between /o/ and /ɔ/ has been lost in Tikumbasi.

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References

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Anderson, Stephen C. 1980. The noun class system of Amo. In Hyman, Larry M. (ed.), Noun classes in the Grassfields Bantu borderland (Southern California Occasional Papers in Linguistics 8), 155178. Los Angeles, CA: University of Southern California.
Aoki, Haruo. 1968. Towards a typology of vowel harmony. International Journal of American Linguistics 34(2), 142145.
Goldsmith, John A. 1990. Autosegmental & metrical phonology. Oxford: Blackwell.
Hyman, Larry M. 1975. Phonology. New York: Holt, Rinehart, and Winston.
Kisseberth, Charles & Odden, David. 2003. Tone. In Nurse, Derek & Phillipson, Gérard (eds.), The Bantu languages, 5970. London: Routledge.
Lewis, M. Paul, Simons, Gary F. & Fennig, Charles D.. 2013. Ethnologue: Languages of the world, 17th edn. Dallas, TX: SIL International. [http://www.ethnologue.com]
McGill, Stuart. 2009. Gender and person agreement in Cicipu discourse. Ph.D. dissertation, School of Oriental and African Studies. [http://www.cicipu.org/papers/gender_and_person_agreement_in_cicipu_discourse.pdf]
McGill, Stuart. 2011. Vowel harmony, transparency, and opacity in Cicipu. Presented at the West African Phonology Day, School of Oriental and African Studies, April 2011. [http://www.cicipu.org/papers/2011-04-28%20Vowel%20harmony%20in%20Cicipu.pdf]
McGill, Stuart. 2012. The development of long consonants in Cicipu: A comparative perspective. In Blench, Roger M. & McGill, Stuart (eds.), Advances in minority language research in Nigeria (African Languages Monographs 5), vol. 1, 273323. Cologne: Rüdiger Köppe.
Newman, Paul. 2000. The Hausa language: An encyclopedic reference grammar. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.

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Cicipu

  • Stuart McGill (a1)

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