Skip to main content
×
Home
Journal of the International Phonetic Association
  • ISSN: 0025-1003 (Print), 1475-3502 (Online)
  • Editor: Professor Amalia Arvaniti University of Kent, UK
  • Editorial board
The Journal of the International Phonetic Association (JIPA) is a forum for original research in the fields of phonetic theory and description and their phonological, typological and broader implications. JIPA encourages submissions in both well-known and un(der)documented linguistic varieties, including minority and endangered languages. JIPA also publishes review papers on current topics in phonetic theory, analysis and instrumentation, and invites proposals for special issues on topics related to its subject matter. As well as publishing research on phonetics, laboratory phonology and related topics, the journal welcomes submissions on practical applications of phonetics to areas such as phonetics teaching, speech therapy, and computer speech processing, provided the focus of such submissions is primarily linguistic in nature. JIPA is especially concerned with the theory behind the International Phonetic Alphabet and publishes papers, known as Illustrations of the IPA, that use the alphabet for the analysis and description of the sound structures of a wide variety of languages. JIPA publishes online audio files to supplement the text of the Illustrations and encourages the submission of such supplementary materials for all contributions, including the submission of manuscripts with embedded audio files. JIPA is indexed in a number of leading databases, including Web of Science (AHCI & SSCI) and Scopus.

Recently published articles




Cambridge Extra at LINGUIST List

  • Tasks, methodological transparency and the IRIS database of research materials
  • 20 March 2017, Charlotte Cox
  • Commentary by Emma Marsden, University of York and Margaret Borowczyk, Georgetown University IRIS is a repository of instruments used in second language research. It was created to increase access to the variety of materials used to elicit data for empirical studies (e.g. pictures, participant instructions, language tests, response options, working memory tests, videos, software scripts). These materials are so often left out of research reports, mainly due to publishers’ space constraints. IRIS allows consumers to more directly evaluate the validity of certain research and improves the speed and accuracy of replication research.  It is a free, theory agnostic, database that is searchable across over one hundred different search criteria (such as ‘type of instrument’, ‘research area’, or ‘language’). IRIS currently holds more . . . → Read More: Tasks, methodological transparency and the IRIS database of research materials...
  • The American Association for Applied Linguistics and the Annual Review of Applied Linguistics: New format/closer ties
  • 17 March 2017, Charlotte Cox
  • Commentary by Kathleen M. Bailey, Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey and President, AAAL and Alison Mackey, Georgetown University and Every year for almost four decades, ARAL has served a pivotal role as an official journal of AAAL. ARAL has long been a preeminent source for state-of-the-art reviews and syntheses of timely topics within the field of applied linguistics, thus providing a kind of compass indicating interests and developments in applied linguistics. It will retain this function, in addition to becoming a source for position pieces, methodological critiques, and empirical articles that stay on the pulse of new approaches to the field. On a few occasions, ARAL’s theme has coincided with the theme of the AAAL conference, with . . . → Read More: The American Association for Applied Linguistics and the Annual Review of Applied Linguistics: New format/closer ties...

Related book - Sounds Fascinating: Further Observations on English Phonetics and Phonology