Skip to main content
×
×
Home

Foreword: After Afrofuturism

Abstract

Welcome to our special issue on Technology and Black Music in the Americas. As guest editor, I'd like to offer my personal thanks to all of our contributors, who are exploring relatively uncharted currents in the overall flow of black music technology. I'd also like to thank JSAM editor Ellie M. Hisama and assistant editor Benjamin Piekut for their tireless efforts, as well as their extraordinary abilities as editors to navigate quickly between leaf- and forest-level views.

    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Foreword: After Afrofuturism
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Foreword: After Afrofuturism
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Foreword: After Afrofuturism
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
References
Hide All
Baker Houston A.Modernism and the Harlem Renaissance. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1989.
Carr Ian.Miles Davis: The Definitive Biography. New York: Thunder's Mouth Press, 1999.
Césaire Aimé. Cahier d'un retour au pays natal. 2nd edn. Ed. with introduction, commentary, and notes by Abiola Irele. Columbus: Ohio State University Press, [1939] 2000.
Césaire Aimé. Notebook of a Return to the Native Land. Trans. and ed. Clayton Eshleman and Annette Smith. Middletown, Conn.: Wesleyan University Press, [1939] 2001.
Craft Morgan. “Towards a New Consciousness” (letter to the editor). The Wire, October 2005, 8.
Dery Mark. “Black to the Future: Interviews with Samuel R. Delany, Greg Tate, and Tricia Rose.” In Flame Wars: The Discourse of Cyberculture, ed. Mark Dery, 179222. Durham, N.C.: Duke University Press, 1994.
Diop Cheikh Anta. The Cultural Unity of Black Africa: The Domains of Patriarchy and of Matriarchy in Classical Antiquity. Chicago: Third World Press, 1978.
Ellington Duke. “Ellington: Where Is Jazz Going?” In The Duke Ellington Reader, ed. Mark Tucker, 324–25. New York: Oxford University Press, [1962] 1993.
Eshun Kodwo. More Brilliant Than the Sun: Adventures in Sonic Fiction. London: Quartet Books, 1998.
Everett Anna, and Wallace Amber J., eds. AfroGEEKS: Beyond the Digital Divide. Santa Barbara, Calif.: Center for Black Studies Research, 2007.
Gardell Mattias. In the Name of Elijah Muhammad: Louis Farrakhan and the Nation of Islam. Durham, N.C.: Duke University Press, 1996.
Griffin Farah Jasmine. “Who Set You Flowin'?”: The African-American Migration Narrative. New York: Oxford University Press, 1995.
Harper Michael S.Images of Kin: New and Selected Poems. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1977.
Harrison Max, Charles Fox, and Eric Thacker. The Essential Jazz Records. Vol. 2, Modernism to Postmodernism. London: Continuum International Publishing Group, 2000.
Kantrowitz Barbara et al. , “A is for Ashanti, B is for Black.” Newsweek, 23 September 1991.
Lessing Doris. The Sirian Experiments: The Report by Ambien II, of the Five. New York: Vintage Books, 1982.
Lewis George E. “The Virtual Discourses of Pamela Z.” Journal of the Society for American Music 1/1 (February 2007): 5778.
Lieb Michael. Children of Ezekiel: Aliens, UFOs, the Crisis of Race, and the Advent of End Time. Durham, N.C.: Duke University Press, 1998.
Lovink Geert. “Everything was to be done. All the adventures are still there': A Speculative Dialogue with Kodwo Eshun. 2000. Telepolis website, http://www.heise.de/tp/r4/artikel/6/6902/1.html.
Mailer Norman. Existential Errands. New York: New American Library, 1973.
Miller Paul D. “Afro-Futurism: A Statement of Intentions—Outside In, Inside Out.” 2002. Afrofuturism website, http://www.afrofuturism.net/text/Manifestos/Miller01.html.
Nelson Alondra. “Introduction: Future Texts.” Social Text20/2 (Summer 2002): 115.
“New Performance Interfaces 2.” Computer Music Journal 14/2 (Summer 1990): 87–97.
Pasler Jann. “The Utility of Musical Instruments in the Racial and Colonial Agendas of Late Nineteenth-Century France.” Journal of the Royal Musical Association 129/1 (2004): 2476.
Pasler Jann. Writing Through Music: Essays on Music, Culture, and Politics. New York: Oxford University Press, 2008.
Porter Eric. What Is This Thing Called Jazz? African American Musicians as Artists, Critics, and Activists. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2002.
Puckette Miller. “Languages and Environments for Computer Music: Max at Seventeen.” Computer Music Journal 26/4 (2002): 3143.
Radano Ronald, and Bohlman Philip V.. “Introduction: Music and Race, Their Past, Their Presence.” In Music and the Racial Imagination, ed. Ronald Radano and Bohlman Philip V., 156. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2000.
Rockeymoore Mark A. “What Is Afrofuturism?” 2002. AuthorsDen website, http://www.authorsden.com/visit/viewarticle.asp?AuthorID=7174&id=4308.
Rockwell John. All American Music: Composition in the Late Twentieth Century. New York: Da Capo Press, [1983] 1997.
Rockwell John. “New and Old Music Put in Context” (letter to the editor). New York Times, 17 August 1997.
Sanders Leslie Catherine. The Development of Black Theater in America: From Shadows to Selves. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1989.
Sandoval Chela. “New Sciences: Cyborg Feminism and the Methodology of the Oppressed.” In The Cybercultures Reader, ed. David Bell and Kennedy Barbara M., 374–90. London: Routledge, 2000.
Schwanauer Stephan M., and Levitt David A.. Machine Models of Music. Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press, 1993.
Seachrist Denise E.The Musical World of Halim El-Dabh. Kent, Ohio: Kent State University Press, 2003.
Stanyek Jason. “Transmissions of an Interculture: Pan-African Jazz and Intercultural Improvisation.” In The Other Side of Nowhere: Jazz, Improvisation, and Communities in Dialogue, ed. Daniel Fischlin and Ajay Heble, 87130. Middletown, Conn.: Wesleyan University Press, 2004.
Tingen Paul. Miles Beyond: The Electric Explorations of Miles Davis, 1967–1991. New York: Billboard Books, 2003.
Van Trikt Ludwig. “Leroy Jenkins.” Cadence, November 1997, 59.
Veal Michael E.Dub: Soundscapes & Shattered Songs in Jamaican Reggae. Middletown, Conn.: Wesleyan University Press, 2007.
Wallace Michele. Black Macho and the Myth of the Superwoman. London: Verso, [1978] 1999.
Weheliye Alexander G. “‘Feenin’: Posthuman Voices In Contemporary Black Popular Music.” Social Text 20/2 (Summer 2002): 2147.
Widener Daniel. “‘Perhaps the Japanese Are to Be Thanked?’: Asia, Asian Americans, and the Construction of Black California.” positions 11/1 (2003): 135–81.
Yavelow Christopher. “A Report on the Workshop for Music Notation by Computer.” Computer Music Journal 11/2 (Summer 1987): 6570.
Davis Miles. Bitches Brew. Columbia G2K 40577 (2 CDs), 1970.
Davis Miles. Miles Smiles. Columbia CL 2601, 1967.
El-Dabh Halim. Crossing Into the Electric Magnetic. Without Fear Recordings, 2001.
Harris Eddie. The Electrifying Eddie Harris. Atlantic SD-1495, 1968.
Harris Eddie. High Voltage. Atlantic SD-1529, 1969.
Harris Eddie. Plug Me In. Atlantic SD-1506, 1968.
Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

Journal of the Society for American Music
  • ISSN: 1752-1963
  • EISSN: 1752-1971
  • URL: /core/journals/journal-of-the-society-for-american-music
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 49
Total number of PDF views: 243 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 239 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 16th December 2017. This data will be updated every 24 hours.