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White Face, Black Voice: Race, Gender, and Region in the Music of the Boswell Sisters

Abstract

The New Orleans hot jazz vocal trio the Boswell Sisters was one of the leading ensembles of the 1930s. Enormously popular with audiences, the Boswells were also recognized by colleagues and peers to be among the finest singers, instrumentalists, and arrangers of their day. Many jazz historians remember them as the first successful white singers who truly “sounded black,” yet they rarely interrogate what “sounding black” meant for the Boswells, not only in technical or musical terms but also as an expression of the cultural attitudes and ideologies that shape stylistic judgments. The Boswells' audience understood vocal blackness as a cultural trope, though that understanding was simultaneously filtered through minstrelsy's legacy and challenged by the new entertainment media. Moreover, the sisters' southern femininity had the capacity to further contexualize and “color” both their musical output and its reception. This essay examines what it meant for a white voice to sound black in the United States during the early 1930s, and charts how the Boswells permeated the cultural, racial, and gender boundaries implicit in both blackness and southernness as they developed their collective musical voice.

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This list contains references from the content that can be linked to their source. For a full set of references and notes please see the PDF or HTML where available.

AverillGage. 2003. Four Parts No Waiting: A Social History of American Barbershop Harmony. New York: Oxford University Press

BadgerAnthony J. 1989. The New Deal: The Depression Years, 1933–1940. Basingstoke: Macmillan

BakerHouston AJr.. 1987. Modernism and the Harlem Renaissance. Chicago: University of Chicago Press

BrownJanet. 1984The ‘Coon-Singer’ and the ‘Coon-Song’: A Case Study of the Performer-Character Relationship.” Journal of American Culture 7: 18.

KnightArthur. 2002. Disintegrating the Musical: Black Performance and American Musical Film. Durham, N.C.: Duke University Press

McPhersonTara. 2003. Reconstructing Dixie: Race, Gender and Nostalgia in the Imagined South. Durham, N.C.: Duke University Press

TuckerSherrie. 2000. Swing Shift: “All-Girl” Bands of the 1940s. Durham, N.C.: Duke University Press

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Journal of the Society for American Music
  • ISSN: 1752-1963
  • EISSN: 1752-1971
  • URL: /core/journals/journal-of-the-society-for-american-music
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