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  • ISSN: 1866-9808 (Print), 1866-9859 (Online)
  • Editors: Dr Rui Chaves The State University of New York at Buffalo, USA , Dr Elaine Francis Purdue University, USA , Dr Judith Holler Radboud University, The Netherlands , Professor Jeannette Littlemore University of Birmingham, UK , Dr Gary Oppenheim Bangor University, UK and Dr Bodo Winter University of Birmingham, UK
  • Editorial board
Language and Cognition is the official journal of the UK Cognitive Linguistics Association. It is a venue for the publication of high quality peer-reviewed research focusing on the interface between language and cognition. It is open to research from the full range of subject disciplines, theoretical backgrounds, and analytical frameworks that populate the language and cognitive sciences, on a wide range of topics. Research published in the journal uses an interdisciplinary, comparative, multi-methodological approach to advance understanding of language and cognition and their intersections. The editors especially encourage submissions that investigate the traditional areas of cognitive linguistics (e.g., conceptual semantics, linguistic categorization, iconicity, metaphor, linguistic relativity, embodied cognition, grammaticalization, construction-based grammar) using experimental, computational, and/or corpus-based methods.

The journal publishes original research articles, systematic review articles (meta-analyses), and book reviews. It does not publish technical reports, commentary articles, or position papers. Normally, book reviews and review articles are solicited by the editors. Please contact the Review Editor first if you would like to submit a book review; if you have an idea for a review article or a special issue of the journal, contact one of the General Editors with your proposal. Only original research articles may be submitted without invitation from one of the editors. Submitted articles should be no shorter than 8,000 words and no longer than 10,000 words, including references, footnotes and appendices. Submissions that significantly exceed the 10,000-word upper limit may be returned by editors without comment or review.

Cambridge Extra at LINGUIST List

  • ‘Word jails’, ‘slang bans’ and the punitive policing of language in schools
  • 10 February 2020, Katie
  • Blog post written by Ian Cushing based on a new article published in Language in Society The late, great linguist and educationalist Ronald Carter wrote that teachers can be forced into acting as a kind of ‘kind of linguistic dentist, polishing here and there, straightening out, removing decay, filling gaps and occasionally undertaking a necessary extraction’. In a new article published in Language in Society, I use Carter’s metaphor as a springboard to critically examine a spate of many current language education policies and pedagogies in schools which are driven by deficit discourses about linguistic variation and change. The focus of the paper is on primary and secondary schools in England who have implemented strict, prescriptive and punitive language policies which attempt . . . → Read More: ‘Word jails’, ‘slang bans’ and the punitive policing of language in schools...
  • Words on the loose: The power of “premium”
  • 27 January 2020, Katie
  • Blog post written by Crispin Thurlow based on a new article published in Language in Society   In a new paper for Language in Society, I open with the following anecdote about the disingenuous power of everyday language games. On a work trip to Stockholm several years ago, I needed to take my two sons along with me. My local colleagues had kindly accommodated us in one of Sweden’s “Elite” hotels. On arrival day, my sons and I checked in and made our way up to the room. As we stepped across the threshold my oldest son declared, with genuine disappointment, “But this isn’t elite!” After I pressed him, he explained that the room was just not big enough. Evidently, he had already learned . . . → Read More: Words on the loose: The power of “premium”...
  • Educating the global citizen or the global consumer?
  • 16 January 2020, Katie
  • Blog post written by Claire Kramsch based on an article published in Language Teaching My views on the impact that globalization has had on the learning and teaching of foreign languages have been very much influenced by my French upbringing. In the fifties in France I learned and then studied German not in order to find a job in Germany, nor to go and visit the country, nor even to make friends with Germans, but to enjoy German literature and to immerse myself in German poems and fairytales. The language for me was indissociable from texts on the page and the imaginary worlds they opened up for me.  Not that I had consciously intended it to be that way. The teaching of German . . . → Read More: Educating the global citizen or the global consumer?...