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Bilingual speech and language ecology in Greek Thrace: Romani and Pomak in contact with Turkish

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 April 2010

Evangelia Adamou
Affiliation:
CNRS (French National Center for Scientific Research), LACITO (Oral Tradition Languages and Civilizations), 7, rue Guy Moquet, 94801 Villejuif, Franceadamou@vjf.cnrs.fr

Abstract

This article examines the influence of language ecology on bilingual speech. It is based on first-hand data from two previously undocumented varieties of Romani and Pomak in contact with Turkish in Greek Thrace; in both cases Turkish is an important language for the community's identity. This analysis shows how the Romani-Turkish “fused lect” was produced by intensive and extensive bilingualism through colloquial contact with the trade language, Turkish. In addition, it shows how semi-sedentary Pomak speakers had limited, institutional contact with Turkish, resulting in more traditional codeswitching and emblematic lexical borrowings. (Language contact, bilingual speech, fused lect, language ecology, Pomak, Romani, Turkish, Greece)*

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2010

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