Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-544b6db54f-s4m2s Total loading time: 0.273 Render date: 2021-10-22T23:43:28.641Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Exploring another side of co-leadership: Negotiating professional identities through face-work in disagreements

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  16 March 2011

Stephanie Schnurr
Affiliation:
Centre for Applied Linguistics, The University of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7AL, United Kingdoms.schnurr@warwick.ac.uk
Angela Chan
Affiliation:
Department of Chinese, Translation, and Linguistics, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kongangela@cityu.edu.hk

Abstract

Traditional perceptions that view leadership as a top-down process are increasingly challenged by so-called critical perspectives that acknowledge that leadership may involve several people. This article explores a particular type of these other leadership constellations, namely co-leadership where members share several leadership responsibilities.

Drawing on more than twenty hours of authentic discourse data recorded in two workplaces in Hong Kong, we employ the analytical concepts of face and identity to identify and describe some of the complex processes through which co-leadership is enacted. Our particular focus is situations in which members of the co-leadership team disagree with each other.

Our findings indicate that co-leadership is a dynamic process in which both members position themselves and each other as leader and co-leader at different moments throughout an interaction. This dynamic nature can be captured particularly well by exploring how face-work and identity construction are accomplished in interlocutors' everyday workplace talk. (Co-leadership, identity, face, workplace discourse, Hong Kong)*

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2011

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Alvarez, Jose Luis, & Svejenova, Silviya (2005). Sharing executive power: Roles and relationships at the top. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Angouri, Jo, & Tseliga, Theodora (2010). “You have no idea what you are talking about!”: From e-disagreement to e-impoliteness in two online fora. Journal of Politeness Research: Language, Behaviour, Culture 6(1):5782.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Antaki, Charles, & Widdicombe, Sue (1998). Identity as an achievement and as a tool. In Antaki, Charles & Widdicombe, Sue (eds.), Identities in talk, 114. London: Sage.Google Scholar
Blum-Kulka, Shoshana; Blondheim, Menahem; & Hacohen, Gonen (2002). Traditions of dispute: From negotiations of talmudic texts to the arena of political discourse in the media. Journal of Pragmatics 34(10–11):1569–94.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Boden, Deirdre (1994). The business of talk: Organizations in action. Cambridge: Polity.Google Scholar
Bourdieu, Pierre (1977). Outline of a theory of practice. Trans. by Nice, R.. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bucholtz, Mary, & Hall, Kira (2005). Identity and interaction: A sociocultural linguistics approach. Discourse Studies 7(4–5):585614.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Chan, Angela (2005). Openings and closings of business meetings in different cultures. Wellington: Victoria University of Wellington dissertation.Google Scholar
Chan, Angela (2008). Meeting openings and closings in a Hong Kong company. In Sun, Hao & DáKadar, niel Z (eds.), It's the dragon's turn: Chinese institutional discourse(s), 181229. Bern: Peter Lang.Google Scholar
Cheng, Winnie, & Tsui, Amy B. M. (2009). “ahh ((laugh)) well there is no comparison between the two I think”: How do Hong Kong Chinese and native speakers of English disagree with each other? Journal of Pragmatics 41:2365–80.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Clayman, Steven E. (2002). Disagreements and third parties: Dilemmas of neutralism in panel news interviews. Journal of Pragmatics 34:13851401.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Clifton, Jonathan (2006). A conversation analytical approach to business communication: The case of leadership. Journal of Business Communication 43(3):202–19.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cranny-Francis, Anne,;Waring, Wendy; Stavropoulos, Pam; & Kirkby, Joan (2003). Gender studies: Terms and debates. Houndmills: Palgrave Macmillan.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Dwyer, Judith (1993). The business communication handbook. 3rd edn.New York: Prentice Hall.Google Scholar
Fairhurst, Gail (2007). Discursive leadership: In conversation with leadership psychology. Los Angeles: Sage.Google Scholar
French, John, & Raven, Bertram (1959). The bases of social power. In Cartwright, Dorwin (ed.), Studies in social power, 150–67. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press.Google Scholar
Geyer, Naomi (2008). Discourse and politeness: Ambivalent face in Japanese. London: Continuum.Google Scholar
Goffman, Erving (1967). Interaction ritual: Essays on face-to-face behavior. New York: Random House.Google Scholar
Goodwin, Marjorie-Harness (1990). He-said-she-said: Talk as social organization among black children. Bloomington: Indiana University Press.Google Scholar
Goodwin, Marjorie-Harness; Goodwin, Charles; & Yaeger-Dror, Malcah (2002). Multi-modality in girl's game disputes. Journal of Pragmatics 34(10–11):1621–49.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gruber, Helmut (1998). Disagreeing: Sequential placement and internal structure of disagreements in conflict episodes. Text 18(4):467503.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Habib, Rania (2008). Humor and disagreement: Identity construction and cross-cultural enrichment. Journal of Pragmatics 40(6):1117–45.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hall, Christopher; Sarangi, Srikant; & Slembrouck, Stefaan (1999). The legitimation of the client and the profession: Identities and roles in social work discourse. In Sarangi, Srikant & Roberts, Celia (eds.), Talk, work and institutional order: Discourse in medical, mediation and management settings, 293321. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hall, Stuart (2000). Who needs identity? In Gay, Paul du, Evans, Jessica, & Redman, Peter (eds.), Identity: A reader, 1530. London: Sage.Google Scholar
Haugh, Michael (2009). Face and interaction. In Bargiela-Chiappini, Francesca & Haugh, Michael (eds.), Face, communication and social interaction, 130. London: Equinox.Google Scholar
Heenan, David A., & Bennis, Warren (1999). Co-leaders: The power of great partnerships. New York: John Wiley & Sons.Google Scholar
Heritage, John (1984). A change-of-state token and aspects of its sequential placement. In Atkinson, J. Maxwell & Heritage, John (eds.), Structure of social action: Studies in conversation analysis, 299345. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Heritage, John, & Greatbatch, David (1991). On the institutional character of institutional talk: The case of news interviews. In Boden, Deirdre & Zimmerman, Don H. (eds.), Talk and social structure: Study in ethnomethodology and conversation analysis, 93137. Cambridge: Polity.Google Scholar
Holmes, Janet, & Marra, Meredith (2004). Leadership and managing conflict in meetings. Pragmatics 14(4):439–62.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Holmes, Janet, & Stubbe, Maria (2003). Power and politeness in the workplace: A sociolinguistic analysis of talk at work. London: Longman.Google Scholar
Holmes, Janet; Stubbe, Maria; & Vine, Bernadette (1999). Constructing professional identity: “Doing power” in policy units. In Sarangi, Srikant & Roberts, Celia (eds.), Talk, work and institutional order: Discourse in medical, mediation and management settings, 351–85. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Holtgraves, Thomas (1992). The linguistic realization of face management: Implications for language production and comprehension, person perception and cross-cultural communication. Social Psychology Quarterly 55:141–59.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hutchby, Ian (1996). Confrontation talk: Arguments, asymmetries, and power on talk radio. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.Google Scholar
Jackson, Brad, & Parry, Ken (2008). A very short, fairly interesting and reasonably cheap book about studying leadership. London: Sage.Google Scholar
Jacobs, Scott (2002). Maintaining neutrality in dispute mediation: Managing disagreement while managing not to disagree. Journal of Pragmatics 34(10–11):1403–26.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Jenkins, Richard (1996). Social identity. London: Routledge.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kakava, Christina (2002). Opposition in Modern Greek discourse: Cultural and contextual constraints. Journal of Pragmatics 34(10–11):1537–68.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kangasharju, Helena (2002). Alignment in disagreement: Forming oppositional alliances in committee meetings. Journal of Pragmatics 34(10–11):1447–71.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kirkbride, Paul; Tang, Sara; & Westwood, Robert (1991). Chinese conflict style and negotiating behaviour: Cultural and psychological influences. Organization Studies 12(3):365–86.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kjaerbeck, Susanne (2008). Narratives as a resource to manage disagreement: Examples from a parents' meeting in an extracurricular activity center. Text & Talk 28:307–26.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kotthoff, Helga (1993). Disagreement and concession in disputes: On the context sensitivity of preference structures. Language in Society 22:193216.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Laforest, Marty (2002). Scenes of family life: Complaining in everyday conversation. Journal of Pragmatics 34(10–11):15951620.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lerner, Gene H. (1996). Finding “face” in the preference structures of talk-in-interaction. Social Psychology Quarterly 59:303–21.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Locher, Miriam (2008). Relational work, politeness, and identity construction. In Antos, Gerd & Weber, Eija Ventola in cooperation with Tilo (eds.), Handbook of interpersonal communication, 509–40. Berlin: Mouton de Gruyter.Google Scholar
Lytra, Vally (2009). Constructing academic hierarchies: Teasing and identity work among peers at school. Pragmatics 19(3):449–66.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
MacMartin, Clare; Wood, Linda; & Kroger, Rolf (2001). Facework. In Robinson, W. Peter & Giles, Howard (eds.), The new handbook of language and social psychology, 221–37. Chichester: John Wiley & Sons.Google Scholar
Myers, Greg (1998). Displaying opinions: Topics and disagreement in focus groups. Language in Society 27:85111.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
O'Toole, James; Galbraith, Jay; & Lawler, Edward E. (2002). When two (or more) heads are better than one: The promise and pitfalls of shared leadership. California Management Review 44(4):6583.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pan, Yuling (2000). Politeness in Chinese face-to-face interaction. Stamford, CT: Ablex.Google Scholar
Pomerantz, Anita (1984). Agreeing and disagreeing with assessments: Some features of preferred/dispreferred turn shapes. In Atkinson, J. Maxwell & Heritage, John (eds.), Structure of social action: Studies in conversation analysis, 57101. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Postmes, Tom (2003). A social identity approach to communication in organizations. In Haslam, Alexander, Knippenberg, Daan van, Platow, Michael, & Ellemers, Naomi (eds.), Social identity at work: Developing theory for organizational practice, 8197. New York: Psychology Press.Google Scholar
Redding, S. Gordon (1990). The spirit of Chinese capitalism. Berlin: Walter de Gruyter.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rees-Miller, Janie (2000). Power, severity, and context in disagreement. Journal of Pragmatics 32:10871111.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sally, David (2002). Co-leadership: Lessons from Republican Rome. California Management Review 44(4):8499.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Schegloff, Emanuel A. (1988/1989). From interview to confrontation: Observations on the Bush/Rather encounter. Research on Language and Social Interaction 22:215–40.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Schnurr, Stephanie, & Zayts, Olga (2011). Be(com)ing a leader: A case study of co-constructing professional identities at work. In Angouri, Jo & Marra, Meredith (eds.), Constructing identities at work. Houndmills: Palgrave Macmillan, to appear.Google Scholar
Spencer-Oatey, Helen (2007). Theories of identity and the analysis of face. Journal of Pragmatics 39:639–56.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Stewart, Miranda (2008). Protecting speaker's face in impolite exchanges: The negotiation of face-wants in workplace interaction. Journal of Politeness Research: Language, Behaviour, Culture 4:3154.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Tannen, Deborah (2002). Agnoism in academic discourse. Journal of Pragmatics 34:1651–69.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Tourish, Dennis (2007). Communication, discourse and leadership. Human Relations 60(11):1727–40.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Tracey, Karen (1990). The many faces of facework. In Giles, Howard & Robinson, W. Peter (eds.), Handbook of language and social psychology, 209–26. Chichester: John Wiley & Sons.Google Scholar
Upadhyay, Shiv R. (2010). Identity and impoliteness in computer-mediated reader responses. Journal of Politeness Research 6(1):105–27.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Vine, Bernadette; Holmes, Janet; Marra, Meredith; Pfeifer, Dale; & Jackson, Brad (2008). Exploring co-leadership talk through interactional sociolinguistics. Leadership 4(3):339–60.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Westwood, Robert I. (1992). Culture, cultural differences, and organisational behaviour. In Westwood, Robert I. (ed.), Organisational behaviour: Southeast Asian perspectives, 2762. Hong Kong: Longman.Google Scholar
Zhang, Yanyin (1995). Indirectness in Chinese requesting. In Kasper, Gabriele (ed.), Pragmatics of Chinese as native and target language, 69118. Manoa: Second Language Teaching and Curriculum Center, University of Hawai'i.Google Scholar
35
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Exploring another side of co-leadership: Negotiating professional identities through face-work in disagreements
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Exploring another side of co-leadership: Negotiating professional identities through face-work in disagreements
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Exploring another side of co-leadership: Negotiating professional identities through face-work in disagreements
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *