Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-77ffc5d9c7-lxfbv Total loading time: 0.26 Render date: 2021-04-23T17:20:38.972Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": false, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true }

On the structure of speaker–auditor interaction during speaking turns1

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  18 December 2008

Starkey Duncan Jr
Affiliation:
Department of Behavioral Sciences, Committee on Cognition and Communication, University of Chicago

Abstract

The structure of speaker–auditor interaction during speaking turns was explored, using detailed transcriptions of language, paralanguage, and body-motion behaviors displayed by both participants in dyadic, face-to-face conversations. On the basis of certain observed regularities in these behaviors, three signals were hypothesized: (a) a speaker within-turn signal, (b) an auditor back-channel signal, and (c) a speaker continuation signal. These signals were composed of various behaviors in language and in body motion. It was further hypothesized that the display of appropriate ordered sequences of these signals by both participants, served to mark ‘units of interaction’ during speaking turns. (Conversational analysis; speaking turns; back-channel behaviors; interrelations of verbal and nonverbal behavior; American English (Chicago)).

Type
Articles: On Verbal Interaction
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1974

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

Bernstein, B. (1962). Social class, linguistic codes, and grammatical elements. Language and Speech 5, 221–40.Google Scholar
Ekman, P. & Friesen, W. V. (1969). The repertoire of nonverbal behavior: Categories, origins, usage, and coding. Semiotica I. 4998.Google Scholar
Duncan, S.D. Jr (1972). Some signals and rules for taking speaking turns in conversations. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 23. 283–92.Google Scholar
Duncan, S.D. Jr (1973). Toward a grammar for dyadic conversations. Semiotica 9. 2946.Google Scholar
Duncan, S.D. Jr (1974). Language, paralanguage, and body motion in the structure of conversations. In McCormack, W. C. & Wurm, S. A. (eds.), Language and thought. The Hague: Mouton (1975).Google Scholar
Duncan, S.D. Jr & Niederehe, G. (1974). On signalling that it's your turn to speak. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 10. 234–47.Google Scholar
Kendon, A. (1967). Some functions of gaze-direction in social interaction. Acta Psychologica 26. 2263.Google Scholar
Trager, G. L. & Smith, H. L. Jr (1957). An outline of English structure. Washington, D.C.: American Council of Learned Societies.Google Scholar
Trager, G. L. (1958). Paralanguage: A first approximation. Studies in Linguistics 13. 112.Google Scholar
Yngve, V. H. (1970). On getting a word in edgewise. Papers from the sixth regional meeting Chicago Linguistic Society. Chicago: Chicago Linguistic Society. 567–77.Google Scholar

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Full text views reflects PDF downloads, PDFs sent to Google Drive, Dropbox and Kindle and HTML full text views.

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 197 *
View data table for this chart

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 23rd April 2021. This data will be updated every 24 hours.

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

On the structure of speaker–auditor interaction during speaking turns1
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

On the structure of speaker–auditor interaction during speaking turns1
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

On the structure of speaker–auditor interaction during speaking turns1
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response


Your details


Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *