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Welsh and English in the city of Bangor: A study in functional differentiation

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 February 2009

Cora F. Lindsay
Affiliation:
Illyés Gyula Teacher Training College, Rákóczi út I, 7100 Szekszárd, Hungary

Abstract

This article considers the ways in which the Welsh and English languages are currently used in Bangor, a cathedral and university city in North Wales. The two languages carry different kinds of authority in different contexts and are acquired in different ways by children from different backgrounds. Some religious institutions have a clear commitment to one language, but others practice various forms of bilingualism. The relationship between the two languages in education and the other public services is partially determined by consciously formulated language policies but is less consistent than some official statements might suggest. The patterns of usage in commercial and domestic life are even more various and frequently involve complex forms of code-switching. (Welsh, English, Wales, bilingualism)

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1993

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