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  • Cited by 7
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    This article has been cited by the following publications. This list is generated based on data provided by CrossRef.

    al-Rojaie, Yousef 2013. Regional dialect leveling in Najdi Arabic: The case of the deaffrication of [k] in the Qaṣīmī dialect. Language Variation and Change, Vol. 25, Issue. 01, p. 43.


    Rosenhouse, Judith 2012. The Handbook of Bilingualism and Multilingualism.


    Farwaneh, Samira 2005. Gender and the Language of Religion.


    YANG, YONGLIN 2000. SEX AND SKILL DIFFERENCES IN TRANSLATION OF ENGLISH COLOR WORDS BY CHINESE STUDENTS. Perceptual and Motor Skills, Vol. 91, Issue. 3f, p. 1181.


    YANG, YONGLIN 2000. SEX AND SKILL DIFFERENCES IN TRANSLATION OF ENGLISH COLOR WORDS BY CHINESE STUDENTS. Perceptual and Motor Skills, Vol. 91, Issue. 3f, p. 1181.


    Feghali, Ellen 1997. Arab cultural communication patterns. International Journal of Intercultural Relations, Vol. 21, Issue. 3, p. 345.


    Holmes, Janet 1991. Language and gender. Language Teaching, Vol. 24, Issue. 04, p. 207.


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Are Iraqi women more prestige conscious than men? Sex differentiation in Baghdadi Arabic

  • Farida Abu-Haidar (a1)
  • DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0047404500013865
  • Published online: 18 December 2008
Abstract
ABSTRACT

Investigators have found in Arabic-speaking communities that men's speech, and not women's, approximated the standard variety. More recent studies have challenged the assumption that prestige and standard spoken Arabic are one and the same. These studies have found that there are, in some Arab communities, prestige varieties of spoken Arabic which are not in the direction of standard Arabic, and that, contrary to what had been previously concluded, it is mostly women who speak the prestige dialects. This article, based on an investigation of the speech of a group of Baghdadi men and women, shows that in Baghdad the prestige variety of spoken Arabic is in the direction of the standard, and that women, more than men, tend to favor this variety. Using the findings of a previous research project in Baghdad, the article also draws attention to the fact that in the past, when Baghdadi women did not have the same access to standard Arabic as men, it was men, and not women, who spoke a dialect approximating the standard variety. (Standard literary Arabic, dialectal Arabic, linguistic prestige norms, style shifting)

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H. R. E. Abd-el-Jawad (1986). The emergence of an urban dialect in the Jordanian urban centers. International Journal of the Sociology of Language 61(5):5363.

C. A. Ferguson (1959). Diglossia. Word 15:325–40.

D. Hymes (1967). Models of the interaction of language and social setting. Journal of Social Issues 23:828.

T. F. Mitchell (1986). What is eduated spoken Arabic? International Journal of the Sociology of Language 61 (5):732.

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Language in Society
  • ISSN: 0047-4045
  • EISSN: 1469-8013
  • URL: /core/journals/language-in-society
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