Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-8bbf57454-kknlk Total loading time: 0.204 Render date: 2022-01-22T10:17:06.853Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Educating the global citizen or the global consumer?

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 December 2019

Claire Kramsch*
Affiliation:
University of California, Berkeley, USA

Abstract

In this paper I review three models of language that have dominated language learning and teaching in the last 40 years: the textual model, the information exchange model, and the multilingual model. I analyze each one and consider how it stacks up to instances of language use in a globalized world. I then propose moving beyond the metaphors of citizens and consumers, and consider language teaching as educating denizens of a global ecology that requires sensitivity to context, political awareness, ethical answerability and a good dose of situational cunning.

Type
Plenary Speech
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2019

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Footnotes

This paper is a combination of three keynote speeches delivered over the last two years at various venues. The first, ‘Translating culture as epistemological challenge in global times’ was presented at the conference Language Education Across Borders’ at the University of Graz, Austria, in December 2017. The second, ‘The politics of culture in foreign language education’ was presented at the 7th Liberal Arts international conference Liberal Arts in the Global Age at the Texas A&M University in Doha, Qatar, in March 2019. The third, ‘Educating global citizens or global consumers?’ was presented at the conference Global Citizenship and Foreign Language Education at the University of Munich, Germany, in March 2019. I wish to thank Sarah Mercer and Sabine Schmölzer-Eibinger in Graz, Aymen Elsheikh in Doha, and Christiane Lütge in Munich for their kind invitation to present at their respective institutions.

References

Anderson, B. (1998). Die Erfindung der Nation. Zur Karriere eines folgenreichen Konzepts. (Tr. from Imagined communities: Reflections on the origin and spread of Nationalism (1983). Berlin, Germany: Ullstein.Google Scholar
Beaven, B. (2010). IATEFL 2009 Cardiff conference selections. Canterbury: IATEFL.Google Scholar
Bertschi-Kaufmann, A., & Rosebrock, C. (2013). Literalität erfassen: bildungspolitisch, kulturell, individuell. In Rosebrock, C. & Bertschi-Kaufmann, A. (Eds.), Literalität erfassen: bildungspolitisch, kulturell, individuell [What is literacy? Educational, Cultural, and Individual [perspectives], my translation.] (pp. 712). Weinheim & Berlin: Beltz Juventa.Google Scholar
Bhabha, H. (1994/2004). The location of culture. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
Bourdieu, P. (1991). Language and symbolic power. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
Bourdieu, P. (1992). Die verborgenen Mechanismen der Macht. In Steinrücke, M. (Ed.), Schriften zu Politik und Kultur. Hamburg, Germany: VSA Verlag.Google Scholar
Canagarajah, S. (2013). Translingual practice: Global Englishes and cosmopolitan relations. London, UK: Routledge.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cook, G. (2010). Translation in language teaching. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Cope, B., & Kalantzis, M. (2000). Multiliteracies: Literacy learning and the design of social futures. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
Darnton, R. (2000). Paris: The early internet. New York Review of Books, 29 June, 47:11.Google Scholar
Douglas Fir Group. (2016). A transdisciplinary framework for SLA in a multilingual world. Modern Language Journal, 100, 1947.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gee, J., Hull, G., & Lankshear, C. (1996). The new work order: Behind the language of the new capitalism. Boulder, CO: Westview Press.Google Scholar
Gramling, D. (2016). The invention of monolingualism. London: Bloomsbury.Google Scholar
Gramling, D. (2019). Supralingualism and the translatability industry. Applied Linguistics, doi:10.1093/applin/amz023CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Halliday, M. A. K. (2002). Applied linguistics as an evolving theme. Singapore: Plenary address to the International Association of Applied Linguistics, December.Google Scholar
Holquist, M. (1981). The politics of representation. In Greenblatt, S. (Ed.), Allegory and representation (pp. 163183). Baltimore, MD: John Hopkins University Press.Google Scholar
Holquist, M. 2007. ‘Between Jepthah and Berlitz’ MLA Newsletter Summer 2007.Google Scholar
Hymes, D. (1972). On communicative competence. In Pride, J. B. & Holmes, J. (Eds.), Sociolinguistics (pp. 269293). London: Penguin.Google Scholar
Hymes, D. (1987). Communicative competence. In Ammon, U., Dittmar, N. & Mattheier, K. J. (Eds.), Sociolinguistics/Soziolinguistik (Vol. 1, pp. 219229). Berlin, Germany: Walter de Gruyter.Google Scholar
Ives, M. (2019, 29 January) Did a Thai singer's swastika represent hate or ignorance? The New York Times, p. A12.Google Scholar
Kern, R. (2015). Language, literacy, and technology. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Kramsch, C. (2006). The traffic in meaning. Asia Pacific Journal of Education, 26(1), 99104.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kramsch, C. (2009). The multilingual subject. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Kramsch, C. (2011). The symbolic dimensions of the intercultural. Language Teaching, 44(3), 354367.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kramsch, C. (2013). Afterword. In Norton, B. (Ed.), Identity and language learning: Extending the conversation (2nd ed., pp. 192201). Bristol: Multilingual Matters.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kramsch, C. (2014). Teaching foreign languages in an era of globalization: Introduction. Modern Language Journal, 98(1), 296311.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kramsch, C. (2015). Applied Linguistics: A theory of the practice. Applied Linguistics, 36(4), 454465.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kramsch, C. (2019). Between globalization and decolonization: Foreign languages in the cross-fire. In Macedo, D. (Ed.), Decolonizing foreign language education (pp. 5072). London: Routledge.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kramsch, C., & Hua, Z. (2019). Translating culture in global times: An introduction. Applied Linguistics. doi:10.1093/applin/amz020CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kramsch, C., & Narcy-Combes, J. P. (2017). From social tasks to language development: Coping with historicity and subjectivity. In Ahmadian, M., Mayo, G. & del Pilar, M. (Eds.), Recent perspectives on task-based language learning and teaching (pp. 195213). Berlin, Germany: Mouton de Gruyter.Google Scholar
Moltmann, J. (2009). Theology of hope: On the ground and the implications of Christian eschatology. Tr. from German by J. Leitch. Minneapolis, MN: Augsburg Fortress.Google Scholar
Morton, J. M. 2019. How elite promotes diversity without difference. Aeon Newsletter 13 February 2019. http://aeon.com/essays/.Google Scholar
Norton, B. (2000). Identity and language learning. London: Longman.Google Scholar
Norton, B. (2013). Identität, Literalität und das multilinguale Klassenzimmer. In Rosebrock, C. & Bertschi-Kaufmann, A. (Eds.), Literalität erfasssen: bildungspolitisch, kulturell, individuell (pp. 123134). Weinheim & Berlin: Beltz Juventa.Google Scholar
Park, J. (2019). Translating culture in the global workplace: Language, communication and diversity management. Applied Linguistics. doi :10.1093/applin/amz019CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pennycook, A. (2004). Language policy and the ecological turn. Language Policy, 3, 213239.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pennycook, A. (2010). Language as a local practice. London: Routledge.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Perrin, D., & Kramsch, C. (2019). Introduction. Transdisciplinarity in Applied Linguistics. AILA Review 31, 113.Google Scholar
Pratt, M.-L. (2002). The traffic in meaning: Translation contagion, infiltration. Profession, 2002, 2536.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rosebrock, C., & Bertschi-Kaufmann, A. (2013). Literalität erfassen: bildungspolitisch, kulturell, individuell [What is literacy? Educational, Cultural, and Individual [perspectives], my trsl.]. Weinheim & Berlin: Beltz Juventa.Google Scholar
Stewart, D.-L. 2017. Language of appeasement. Inside Higher Education. https://www.insidehighered.com/views/2017/03/30Google Scholar
Street, B. (2009). ‘Hidden’ features of academic paper writing. Working Papers in Educational Linguistics (WPEL), 24(1), 117.Google Scholar
Wei, L. (2018). Translanguaging as a practical theory of language. Applied Linguistics, 39(1), 930.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
3
Cited by

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Educating the global citizen or the global consumer?
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Educating the global citizen or the global consumer?
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Educating the global citizen or the global consumer?
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *