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Global Englishes and language teaching: A review of pedagogical research

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  09 November 2020

Heath Rose*
Affiliation:
Department of Education, University of Oxford, UK
Jim McKinley
Affiliation:
Institute of Education, University College London, UK
Nicola Galloway
Affiliation:
School of Education, University of Glasgow, UK
*
*Corresponding author. Email: heath.rose@education.ox.ac.uk

Abstract

The rise of English as a global language has led scholars to call for a paradigm shift in the field of English language teaching (ELT) to match the new sociolinguistic landscape of the twenty-first century. In recent years a considerable amount of classroom-based research and language teacher education (LTE) research has emerged to investigate these proposals in practice. This paper outlines key proposals for change in language teaching from the related fields of World Englishes (WE), English as a lingua franca (ELF), English as an international language (EIL), and Global Englishes, and critically reviews the growing body of pedagogical research conducted within these domains. Adopting the methodology of a systematic review, 58 empirical articles published between 2010 and 2020 were shortlisted, of which 38 were given an in-depth critical review and contextualized within a wider body of literature. Synthesis of classroom research suggests a current lack of longitudinal designs, an underuse of direct measures to explore the effects of classroom interventions, and under-representation of contexts outside of university language classrooms. Synthesis of teacher education research suggests future studies need to adopt more robust methodological designs which measure the effects of Global Englishes content on teacher beliefs and pedagogical practices both before and throughout the programme, and after teachers return to the classroom.

Type
State-of-the-Art Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s) 2020. Published by Cambridge University Press

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