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The use of statistics in L2 acquisition research

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 April 2009

Shawn Loewen
Affiliation:
Michigan State University, USAloewens@msu.edu, gass@msu.edu
Susan Gass
Affiliation:
Michigan State University, USAloewens@msu.edu, gass@msu.edu

Extract

Second language acquisition (SLA) as a discipline has not had a long history and, as any new discipline, has seen growing pains over the years. This research timeline traces the development of the increased and more sophisticated use of statistics in SLA research and the increasing demands for rigor in their use. Use of statistical procedures has been increasing in the SLA literature, but the tools themselves have not developed from within the field; rather the increased use stems from greater statistical sophistication on the part of users. In other words, SLA is not an innovator but an increasingly knowledgeable borrower and adapter of statistical procedures.

Type
Research Timeline
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2009

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References

Bayes, T. (1763). An essay towards solving a problem in the doctrine of chances. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London 3, 370418.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ellis, R. (2005). Measuring implicit and explicit knowledge of a second language: A psychometric study. Studies in Second Language Acquisition 27, 141172.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gass, S. in press. An historical survey of SLA research. In Ritchie, W. & Bhaita, T. (eds.), New handbook of second language acquisition. Leeds: Emerald Group Publishing.Google Scholar
Teleni, V. & Baldauf, R. (1988). Statistical techniques used in three applied linguistics journals, Language Learning, Applied Linguistics and TESOL Quarterly 1980–1986: Implications for readers and researchers. Ms., James Cook University of Northern Queensland.Google Scholar
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