Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-55597f9d44-2qt69 Total loading time: 0.189 Render date: 2022-08-08T08:33:21.016Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

General synthetic domain theory – a logical approach

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 April 1999

BERNHARD REUS
Affiliation:
Institut für Informatik, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Oettingenstr. 67, D-80538 München. Email: reus@informatik.uni-muenchen.de
THOMAS STREICHER
Affiliation:
Fachbereich 4 Mathematik, TU Darmstadt, Schlossgartenstr. 7, D-64289 Darmstadt. Email: streicher@mathematik.tu-darmstadt.de

Abstract

Synthetic domain theory (SDT) is a version of Domain Theory where ‘all functions are continuous’. Following the original suggestion of Dana Scott, several approaches to SDT have been developed that are logical or categorical, axiomatic or model-oriented in character and that are either specialised towards Scott domains or aim at providing a general theory axiomatising the structure common to the various notions of domains studied so far.

In Reus and Streicher (1993), Reus (1995) and Reus (1998), we have developed a logical and axiomatic version of SDT, which is special in the sense that it captures the essence of Domain Theory à la Scott but rules out, for example, Stable Domain Theory, as it requires order on function spaces to be pointwise. In this article we will give a logical and axiomatic account of a general SDT with the aim of grasping the structure common to all notions of domains.

As in loc.cit., the underlying logic is a sufficiently expressive version of constructive type theory. We start with a few basic axioms giving rise to a core theory on top of which we study various notions of predomains (such as, for example, complete and well-complete S-spaces (Longley and Simpson 1997)), define the appropriate notion of domain and verify the usual induction principles of domain theory.

Although each domain carries a logically definable ‘specialization order’, we avoid order-theoretic notions as much as possible in the formulation of axioms and theorems. The reason is that the order on function spaces cannot be required to be pointwise, as this would rule out the model of stable domains à la Berry.

The consequent use of logical language – understood as the internal language of some categorical model of type theory – avoids the irritating coexistence of the internal and the external view pervading purely categorical approaches. Therefore, the paper is aimed at providing an elementary introduction to synthetic domain theory, albeit requiring some knowledge of basic type theory.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
1999 Cambridge University Press

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Footnotes

This work was partially supported by the German Academic Exchange Office (DAAD) in the project ‘Vigoni’.
11
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

General synthetic domain theory – a logical approach
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

General synthetic domain theory – a logical approach
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

General synthetic domain theory – a logical approach
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *