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Improving the physiological relevance of drug testing for drug-loaded nanoparticles using 3D tumor cell cultures

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 July 2019

Priya Nimbalkar
Affiliation:
Department of Biomedical, Chemical, and Materials Engineering, San Jose State University, 1 Washington Square, San Jose, CA 95112, USA
Peter Tabada
Affiliation:
Department of Biomedical, Chemical, and Materials Engineering, San Jose State University, 1 Washington Square, San Jose, CA 95112, USA
Anuja Bokare
Affiliation:
Department of Biomedical, Chemical, and Materials Engineering, San Jose State University, 1 Washington Square, San Jose, CA 95112, USA
Jeffrey Chung
Affiliation:
Department of Biomedical, Chemical, and Materials Engineering, San Jose State University, 1 Washington Square, San Jose, CA 95112, USA
Marzieh Mousavi
Affiliation:
Department of Biomedical, Chemical, and Materials Engineering, San Jose State University, 1 Washington Square, San Jose, CA 95112, USA
Melinda Simon
Affiliation:
Department of Biomedical, Chemical, and Materials Engineering, San Jose State University, 1 Washington Square, San Jose, CA 95112, USA
Folarin Erogbogbo*
Affiliation:
Department of Biomedical, Chemical, and Materials Engineering, San Jose State University, 1 Washington Square, San Jose, CA 95112, USA
*
Address all correspondence to Folarin Erogbogbo at folarin.erogbogbo@sjsu.edu
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Abstract

Nanoparticle-mediated drug delivery has the potential to overcome several limitations of cancer chemotherapy. Lipid polymer hybrid nanoparticles (LPHNPs) have been demonstrated to exhibit superior cellular delivery efficacy. Hence, doxorubicin (a chemotherapeutic drug)-loaded LPHNPs have been synthesized by three-dimensional (3D)-printed herringbone-patterned multi-inlet vortex mixer. This method offers rapid and efficient mixing of reactants yielding controllable and reproducible synthesis of LPHNPs. The cytotoxicity of LPHNPs is tested using two-dimensional (2D) and 3D microenvironments. Results obtained from 3D cell cultures showed major differences in cytotoxicity in comparison with 2D cultures. These results have broad implications in predicting in vitro LPHNP toxicology.

Type
Research Letters
Information
MRS Communications , Volume 9 , Issue 3 , September 2019 , pp. 1053 - 1059
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2019 

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