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  • ISSN: 0332-5865 (Print), 1502-4717 (Online)
  • Editors: Gunnar Ólafur Hansson University of British Columbia, Canada, Marit Julien Lund University, Sweden, Matti Miestamo University of Helsinki, Finland, and Sara Myrberg Lund University, Sweden
  • Editorial board
The Nordic Journal of Linguistics is published by Cambridge University Press for the Nordic Association of Linguists. The journal covers all branches of linguistics, with a special focus on issues related to the Nordic languages (including Finnish, Greenlandic and Saami) and on issues of general theoretical interest. The editors encourage submission of research articles, debate contributions and book reviews. One volume is published per calendar year, and each volume contains three issues, one of which is a thematic issue.

Cambridge Extra at LINGUIST List

  • Cambridge at AAAL 2021
  • 19 March 2021, Jen Malat
  • We’re sorry that we won’t be able to meet in person at the AAAL conference this year and invite you to visit our virtual exhibit table, including a discount Plus, AAAL delegates can join our editor Rebecca Taylor at the panel session on 23 March at 11am talking all things publishing in applied linguistics!   What’s new in applied linguistics from Cambridge? Journals Cambridge is working to open up the scholarship published in our journals. If there’s an agreement in place between CUP and your university, you may be able to publish in our applied linguistics journals Open Access and free . . . → Read More: Cambridge at AAAL 2021...
  • An Historical Linguistics Detective Story. This is well confusing!
  • 18 December 2020, Dan Iredale
  • Written by James Stratton, author of A Diachronic Analysis of the Adjective Intensifier well from Early Modern English to Present Day English in the Canadian If you want to convince someone that the book you just read is worth reading, you can intensify your speech. Intensifiers are linguistic devices which allow speakers to impress, praise, persuade, and generally influence a listener’s understanding of a message. A sentence like “the book was so interesting” is clearly more convincing than just “the book was interesting”. However, specific intensifiers can go stale over time if they are overused, which means that different intensifiers are favored at different points in time. In Present Day English, the three most frequently used intensifiers are so, really, and very, . . . → Read More: An Historical Linguistics Detective Story. This is well confusing!...
  • Linguistic Reflections of a coronaspeak year
  • 10 December 2020, Rachel
  • Photo by Matthew Fassnacht on Unsplash Well, what a year this has been! A year like no other. Where life and even the way we interact changed. It is inevitable then that many of our authors blogged about the virus, its impact on not only us, but also our language. As Michael Toolan reflects ‘…as with every new phenomenon with the potential to turn our world upside down, our first response, immediate and intimate but with potential to go global, is in our language.’ Words such as lockdown, quarantine (Cambridge Dictionary’s word of the year 2020) and ‘the rona’ have all made their way into every day vocabulary. As David Crystal reflected, ‘the majority of the neologisms are blends – the combination of parts . . . → Read More: Linguistic Reflections of a coronaspeak year...

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