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Factors Affecting the Utilization of ‘Poor-Quality’ Forages by Ruminants Particularly Under Tropical Conditions

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 December 2007

R. A. Leng
Affiliation:
Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology and Nutrition, University of New England, Armidale, NSW 2351, Australia
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Abstract

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Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Nutrition Society 1990

References

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