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Alternative strategies for amphibian conservation: a response to Muths & Fisher

  • Franco Andreone (a1)
Abstract

The so-called amphibian crisis is mostly managed by IUCN through the Species Survival Commission Amphibian Specialist Group in collaboration with the Amphibian Survival Alliance, and its management is considered to be the most important implementation of the Amphibian Conservation Action Plan (Gascon et al., 2007). In the Amphibian Conservation Action Plan  meeting held in 2005 several actions were planned and the investment needed for amphibian conservation was estimated. More than a decade later, however, much remains to be done, especially in response to heterogeneous emergencies that could cause amphibian extinctions. In this context Muths & Fisher (2015) suggest an alternative approach.

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This list contains references from the content that can be linked to their source. For a full set of references and notes please see the PDF or HTML where available.

M.C. Bletz , G.M. Rosa , F. Andreone , E.A. Courtois , D.S. Schmeller , N.H.C. Rabibisoa (2015) Widespread presence of the pathogenic fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis in wild amphibian communities in Madagascar. Scientific Reports, 5, 110.

E. Muths & R.N. Fisher (2015) An alternative framework for responding to the amphibian crisis. Oryx, http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0030605315001131.

T.A. Yap , M.S. Koo , R.F. Ambrose , D.B. Wake & V.T. Vredenburg (2015) Averting a North American biodiversity crisis. Science, 349, 481482.

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Oryx
  • ISSN: 0030-6053
  • EISSN: 1365-3008
  • URL: /core/journals/oryx
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