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An assessment of the distribution and conservation status of hornbill species in Thailand

  • Yongyut Trisurat (a1), Vijak Chimchome (a1), Anak Pattanavibool (a2), Sitthichai Jinamoy (a3), Siriporn Thongaree (a4), Budsabong Kanchanasakha (a4), Saksit Simcharoen (a4), Kriangsak Sribuarod (a4), Narong Mahannop (a4) and Pilai Poonswad (a3)...
Abstract

Many hornbill species in Thailand are categorized as Endangered or Critically Endangered on the IUCN Red List. The objectives of this research were to predict hornbill distributions in Thailand and to assess the national conservation status of the species using extent of occurrence. We employed maximum entropy modelling, using 10 environmental variables that were believed to directly or indirectly influence hornbill distributions across Thailand, to predict the habitats potentially suitable for 10 of the country's 13 hornbill species. Data on the presence of hornbills were gathered from the Thailand Hornbill Project and additional field surveys in protected area complexes during 2004–2006. The results indicated that patch size is the most important factor affecting distribution, followed by latitude, ecoregion and distance to villages. All hornbill species were predicted to occur primarily in intact protected area complexes. The total extent of all hornbill habitats covers 9.3% of the country's land area. Seven of the 10 modelled species are at risk and the current distribution pattern is expected to reflect stochastic extinctions because of small population size. We recommend that the conservation status of Austen's brown hornbill Anorrhinus austeni and Tickell's brown hornbill Anorrhinus tickelli should be changed from Vulnerable to Endangered. The model identified five protected area complexes as hornbill hotspots in Thailand. These findings will help guide conservation management.

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Corresponding author
(Corresponding author) E-mail fforyyt@ku.ac.th
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Oryx
  • ISSN: 0030-6053
  • EISSN: 1365-3008
  • URL: /core/journals/oryx
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