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    Dunston, Emma J. Abell, Jackie Doyle, Rebecca E. Evershed, Megan and Freire, Rafael 2016. Exploring African lion (Panthera leo) behavioural phenotypes: individual differences and correlations between sociality, boldness and behaviour. Journal of Ethology, Vol. 34, Issue. 3, p. 277.


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Estimating population sizes of lions Panthera leo and spotted hyaenas Crocuta crocuta in Uganda's savannah parks, using lure count methods

  • Edward Okot Omoya (a1), Tutilo Mudumba (a1), Stephen T. Buckland (a2), Paul Mulondo (a1) and Andrew J. Plumptre (a1)
  • DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0030605313000112
  • Published online: 24 October 2013
Abstract
Abstract

Despite > 60 years of conservation in Uganda's national parks the populations of lions and spotted hyaenas in these areas have never been estimated using a census method. Estimates for some sites have been extrapolated to other protected areas and educated guesses have been made but there has been nothing more definitive. We used a lure count analysis method of call-up counts to estimate populations of the lion Panthera leo and spotted hyaena Crocuta crocuta in the parks where reasonable numbers of these species exist: Queen Elizabeth Protected Area, Murchison Falls Conservation Area and Kidepo Valley National Park. We estimated a total of 408 lions and 324 hyaenas for these three conservation areas. It is unlikely that other conservation areas in Uganda host > 10 lions or > 40 hyaenas. The Queen Elizabeth Protected Area had the largest populations of lions and hyaenas: 140 and 211, respectively. It is estimated that lion numbers have declined by 30% in this protected area since the late 1990s and there are increasing concerns for the long-term viability of both species in Uganda.

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(Corresponding author) E-mail aplumptre@wcs.org
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This list contains references from the content that can be linked to their source. For a full set of references and notes please see the PDF or HTML where available.

H. Bauer & S. Van Der Merwe (2004) Inventory of free-ranging lions Panthera leo in Africa. Oryx, 38, 2631.

S.T. Buckland , R.W. Summers , D.L. Borchers & L. Thomas (2006) Point transect sampling with traps or lures. Journal of Applied Ecology, 43, 377384.

A. Dacier , A. Gabriela de Luna , E. Fernandez-Duque & A. Di Fiore (2011) Estimating population density of Amazonian Titi Monkeys (Callicebus discolor) via playback point counts. Biotropica, 43, 135140.

S.M. Ferreira & P.J. Funston (2010) Estimating lion population variables: prey and disease effects in Kruger National Park, South Africa. Wildlife Research, 37, 194206.

M.W.Hayward & G.I.H.Kerley (2005) Prey preferences of the lion (Panthera leo). Journal of Zoology, 267, 309322.



J.O. Ogutu & H.T. Dublin (1998) The response of lions and spotted hyenas to sound playbacks as a technique for estimating population size. African Journal of Ecology, 36, 8395.

A. Treves , A.J. Plumptre , L. Hunter & J. Ziwa (2009) Identifying a potential lion, Panthera leo, stronghold in Queen Elizabeth National Park, Uganda and Parc National des Virunga, Democratic Republic of Congo. Oryx, 43, 18.

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Oryx
  • ISSN: 0030-6053
  • EISSN: 1365-3008
  • URL: /core/journals/oryx
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