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Pangolins in south-west Nigeria – current status and prognosis

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  24 April 2009

Olufemi A. Sodeinde
Affiliation:
Department of Biological Sciences, Ogun State University, PMB 2002, Ago-Iwoye, Nigeria.
Segun R. Adedipe
Affiliation:
Department of Biological Sciences, Ogun State University, PMB 2002, Ago-Iwoye, Nigeria.
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Abstract

Despite being officially listed as endangered in Nigeria, pangolins are still hunted in Ogun State, where deforestation has fragmented and reduced their forest habitat. To investigate pangolin status in the state, the authors interviewed hunters, forest workers and market traders selling wild animals or their parts for medicinal use. The authors also counted pangolins stocked by market traders during weekly visits to markets in six towns/villages. Only one of Nigeria's three pangolin species, Manis tricuspis, was encountered frequently. Hunters' reports and evidence of forest destruction suggest that even this species is becoming rare. An estimate of extinction-susceptibility shows that pangolins are at fairly high risk. Creation of sanctuaries for pangolins and other important sympatric vertebrates in forest relicts in south-west Nigeria and the establishment of semicaptive pangolin populations are advocated.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Fauna and Flora International 1994

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