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The increasing isolation of Tarangire National Park

  • Markus Borner (a1)
Abstract

In Tanzania, in the dry season, Tarangire National Park is second only to Ngorongoro in the concentrations of wildlife to be seen there. But there is a bleak outlook for the species that traditionally migrate to pastures outside the park in the rainy season. Over the last 10 years many of their routes out of the park have been blocked by farms and ranches, and further expansion of agricultural schemes could threaten the remainder. Part of the zebra and wildebeest populations that migrate north have already been lost. The author, who has been carrying out wildlife surveys in Tanzania for the Frankfurt Zoological Society for seven years, proposes some remedies to prevent the park from becoming the domain of only a few resident species.

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Copyright
References
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EcoSystems Ltd 1980a. The status and utilisation of wildlife in the Arusha Region, Tanzania. EcoSystems Ltd, Box 30239, Nairobi.
EcoSystems Ltd 1980b. Livestock, wildlife and land use survey Arusha region Tanzania. Vol. I: text, Vol. II: fig. And tables. EcoSystems Ltd, Box 30239, Nairobi.
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Peterson, D. 1976. Survey of livestock and wildlife. Seasonal distribution in areas of Masailand adjacent to Tarangire Park. Final report to regional livestock development Department and the Masai range development project. Mimeo.
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Oryx
  • ISSN: 0030-6053
  • EISSN: 1365-3008
  • URL: /core/journals/oryx
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