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Using predator attack data to save lives, human and crocodilian

  • Simon Pooley (a1)
Abstract
Abstract

As human populations grow and transform undeveloped terrestrial and aquatic habitats, human–wildlife conflict inevitably increases. This is particularly problematic for large predators and the humans who live alongside them. Relatively little research has been conducted on alleviating adverse human encounters with one of the most significant predator species in Africa, the Nile crocodile Crocodylus niloticus. This short communication raises questions about some of the general statements made to explain the incidence of attacks by crocodiles. Some of the limitations of the data on such attacks are considered, with recommendations on what kinds of data are required. Data collection and analysis, and how they can inform more effective mitigation efforts, are discussed.

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Copyright
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/), which permits unrestricted re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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P. Aust , B. Boyle , R. Fergusson & T. Coulson (2009) The impact of Nile crocodiles on rural livelihoods in northeastern Namibia. South African Journal of Wildlife Research, 39, 5769.

H. Botha , W. Van Hoven & L.J. Guillette Jr (2011) The decline of the Nile crocodile population in Loskop Dam, Olifants River, South Africa. Water SA, 37, 103108.

D. Caldicott , D. Croser , C. Manolis , G. Webb & A. Britton (2005) Crocodile attack in Australia: an analysis of its incidence and review of the pathology and management of crocodilian attacks in general. Wilderness & Environmental Medicine, 16, 143159.

Y. Fukuda , C. Manolis & K. Appel (2014) Management of human–crocodile conflict in the Northern Territory, Australia: review of crocodile attacks and removal of problem crocodiles. The Journal of Wildlife Management, 78, 12391249.

S.M. Redpath , S. Bhatia & J. Young (2014) Tilting at wildlife: reconsidering human–wildlife conflict. Oryx, 49, 222225.

M.H. Shirley , K.A. Vliet , A.N. Carr & J.D. Austin (2013) Rigorous approaches to species delimitation have significant implications for African crocodilian systematics and conservation. Proceedings of the Royal Society B, 281, 20132483.

K.M. Wallace , A.J. Leslie & T. Coulson (2011) Living with predators: a focus on the issues of human–crocodile conflict within the lower Zambezi valley. Wildlife Research, 38, 747755.

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Oryx
  • ISSN: 0030-6053
  • EISSN: 1365-3008
  • URL: /core/journals/oryx
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