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The effect of dietary sainfoin (Onobrychis viciifolia) on local cellular responses to Trichostrongylus colubriformis in sheep

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 June 2008

L. RÍOS-DE ÁLVAREZ*
Affiliation:
Instituto de Producción Animal, Facultad de Agronomía, Universidad Central de Venezuela, Venezuela Moredun Research Institute, Parasitology Division, Pentlands Science Park, Bush Loan, Midlothian EH26 0PZ, UK
A. W. GREER
Affiliation:
Agriculture and Life Sciences Division, PO Box 84, Lincoln University, Canterbury, New Zealand
F. JACKSON
Affiliation:
Moredun Research Institute, Parasitology Division, Pentlands Science Park, Bush Loan, Midlothian EH26 0PZ, UK
S. ATHANASIADOU
Affiliation:
Animal Nutrition and Health Department, Scottish Agricultural College, West Mains Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JG, UK
I. KYRIAZAKIS
Affiliation:
Animal Nutrition and Health Department, Scottish Agricultural College, West Mains Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JG, UK
J. F. HUNTLEY
Affiliation:
Moredun Research Institute, Parasitology Division, Pentlands Science Park, Bush Loan, Midlothian EH26 0PZ, UK
*
*Corresponding author: Instituto de Producción Animal, Facultad de Agronomía, Universidad Central de Venezuela, Venezuela. Tel: +582432454120. +584124767809. Fax: +582432454120. E-mail: riosl@agr.ucv.ve; s0244251@sms.ed.ac.uk

Summary

The effect of sainfoin (Onobrychis viciifolia) hay consumption on the pathophysiology and local cellular responses of growing lambs during infection with Trichostrongylus colubriformis was investigated. Thirty-two lambs, 16 weeks of age, were allocated to 1 of 4 treatment groups (n=8) that were offered either grass (G) or sainfoin (S) hay while concurrently either infected (+), or not (−) with 12 000 L3 T. colubriformis larvae per week for 6 weeks. Liveweight gains were affected by diet (P=0·002) and reduced by infection (P<0·005). Faecal egg count was reduced in S+ compared to G+from days 35 to 42 (P=0·001); however, total egg output, worm burdens at day 42 and worm fecundity were similar between diets (P>0·05). Feeding sainfoin appeared to enhance immune cell development with tissue eosinophils, mast cells and pan T cells present in greater concentrations in S+ than in G+ animals. However, further studies are required to determine if the enhanced immune cell development is a consequence of a greater nutrient supply or a direct influence of sainfoin metabolites on local inflammatory responses to the gastrointestinal nematode T. colubriformis.

Type
Original Articles
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Cambridge University Press

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References

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