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Observations on the epidemiology of coccidial infections in sheep under varying conditions of intensive husbandry including chemoprophylaxis with monensin

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 April 2009

M. W. Gregory
Affiliation:
M.A.F.F. Central Veterinary Laboratory, New Haw, Weybridge, Surrey KT15 3NB
Janet Catchpole
Affiliation:
M.A.F.F. Central Veterinary Laboratory, New Haw, Weybridge, Surrey KT15 3NB
L. P. Joyner
Affiliation:
M.A.F.F. Central Veterinary Laboratory, New Haw, Weybridge, Surrey KT15 3NB
B. N. J. Parker
Affiliation:
M.A.F.F. Central Veterinary Laboratory, New Haw, Weybridge, Surrey KT15 3NB

Summary

Coccidiosis occurs sporadically in lambs at about 6 weeks of age when oocyst output is very high in healthy as well as in diseased lambs. These experiments were designed to throw light on the source of infection and to correlate oocyst output in lambs and ewes with performance in lambs. In two experiments, one indoors on deep litter the other in outdoor paddocks, oocyst output (of different coccidial species), body weight and clinical state of lambs were recorded weekly. Oocyst output in ewes was also recorded, starting 1–4 weeks before lambing. Monensin was included in the concentrates of ewes and/or lambs, up to lambing or before and after lambing. No periparturient rise was detected in the oocyst output of ewes. Monensin drastically reduced oocyst output in animals receiving it. Oocyst output in lambs appeared to be little affected by the output of ewes around the lambing period, but was reduced if the ewes' output was kept low after lambing. Lambs receiving monensin tended to produce drier faeces but their weight gain was not significantly greater than that of controls. Eimeria crandallis was the predominant species in the lambs, followed by E. ovinoidalis and E. ovina.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1983

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References

REFERENCES

Fitzgerald, P. R. & Mansfield, M. E. (1978). Ovine coccidiosis: effects of the antibiotic monensin against Eimeria ninakohlyakimovae and other naturally occurring coccidia of sheep. American Journal of Veterinary Research 39 (1), 710.Google Scholar
Gregory, M. W., Joyner, L. P. & Catchpole, J. (1982). Medication against ovine coccidiosis: a review. Veterinary Research Communications 5 (4), 307–25.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Gregory, M. W., Joyner, L. P., Catchpole, J. & Norton, C. C. (1980). Ovine coccidiosis in England and Wales 1978–1979. Veterinary Record 106, 461–2.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Pout, D. D. (1965). Coccidiosis in lambs. Veterinary Record 77, 887–8.Google ScholarPubMed
Wacha, R. S., Hammond, D. M. & Miner, M. L. (1971). The development of the endogenous stages of Eimeria ninakohlyakimovae (Yakimoff & Rastagaieff 1930) in domestic sheep. Proceedings of the Helminthological Society of Washington 38, 167–80.Google Scholar
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Observations on the epidemiology of coccidial infections in sheep under varying conditions of intensive husbandry including chemoprophylaxis with monensin
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