Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-768ffcd9cc-9th95 Total loading time: 0.527 Render date: 2022-12-02T16:38:40.765Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "useRatesEcommerce": false } hasContentIssue true

The Dual Landscape Model of Adaptation and Niche Construction

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 January 2022

Abstract

Wright’s “adaptive landscape” has been influential in evolutionary thinking but controversial, especially because the landscape that organisms encounter is altered by the evolutionary process itself and the effects organisms have on their environments. Lewontin offered a mathematical heuristic describing the coupling of niche construction and adaptive evolution. Here, we propose a “dual landscape” model to view these relationships. Our model represents change as simultaneous movement on two landscapes, each a function of phenotype and environment. This model clarifies the evolutionary feedback generated by niche construction. We relate our model to Lewontin’s niche construction equations and illustrate it with three examples.

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © The Philosophy of Science Association

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Footnotes

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest. We thank Daniel Falster, Rebecca Chisholm, Frank Valckenborgh, and members of the Kerr lab for helpful discussions about fitness landscapes and adaptive dynamics. This work was supported by grant FT140100398 from the Australian Research Council.

References

Bank, Claudia, Matuszewski, Sebastian, Hietpas, Ryan T., and Jensen, Jeffrey D. 2016. “On the (un)Predictability of a Large Intragenic Fitness Landscape.” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 113 (49): 14085–90..CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Boni, Maciej F., and Feldman, Marcus W. 2005. “Evolution of Antibiotic Resistance by Human and Bacterial Niche Construction.” Evolution 59 (3): 477–91..Google ScholarPubMed
Calcott, Brett. 2008. “Assessing the Fitness Landscape Revolution.” Biology and Philosophy 23 (5): 639–57..CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cervera, Héctor, Lalić, Jasna, and Elena, Santiago F. 2016. “Efficient Escape from Local Optima in a Highly Rugged Fitness Landscape by Evolving RNA Virus Populations.” Proceedings of the Royal Society of London B 283 (1836): 20160984.Google Scholar
Conlin, Peter L., Chandler, Josephine R., and Kerr, Benjamin. 2014. “Games of Life and Death: Antibiotic Resistance and Production through the Lens of Evolutionary Game Theory.” Current Opinion in Microbiology 21:3544.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Conrad, Michael. 1990. “The Geometry of Evolution.” Biosystems 24:6181.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Cooper, Jacob D., and Kerr, Benjamin. 2016. “Evolution at ‘Sutures’ and ‘Centers’: Recombination Can Aid Adaptation of Spatially Structured Populations on Rugged Fitness Landscapes.” PLOS Computational Biology 12 (12): e1005247.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Coyne, Jerry A., Barton, Nicholas H., and Turelli, Michael. 1997. “Perspective: A Critique of Sewall Wright’s Shifting Balance Theory of Evolution.” Evolution 51 (3): 643–71..CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Dieckmann, Ulf. 2002. “Adaptive Dynamics of Pathogen-Host Interactions.” In Adaptive Dynamics of Infectious Diseases: In Pursuit of Virulence Management, ed. Dieckmann, Ulf et al., 3959. Cambridge Studies in Adaptive Dynamics 2. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Dieckmann, Ulf, and Law, Richard. 1996. “The Dynamical Theory of Coevolution: A Derivation from Stochastic Ecological Processes.” Journal of Mathematical Biology 34 (5–6): 579612.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Dietrich, Michael R., and Skipper, Robert A. Jr. 2012. “A Shifting Terrain: A Brief History of the Adaptive Landscape.” In The Adaptive Landscape in Evolutionary Biology, ed. Svensson, Erik I. and Calsbeek, Ryan, 315. New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Doebeli, Michael. 2012. “Adaptive Dynamics: A Framework for Modeling the Long-Term Evolutionary Dynamics of Quantitative Traits.” In The Adaptive Landscape in Evolutionary Biology, ed. Svensson, Erik I. and Calsbeek, Ryan, 227–42. New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Ewens, Warren J. 1989. “An Interpretation and Proof of the Fundamental Theorem of Natural Selection.” Theoretical Population Biology 36 (2): 167–80..CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Ewens, Warren J. 2010. “What Is the Gene Trying to Do?British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 62 (1): 155–76..Google Scholar
Fisher, Ronald A. 1999. The Genetical Theory of Natural Selection: A Complete Variorum Edition. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Frank, Steven A. 2012. “Wright’s Adaptive Landscape versus Fisher’s Fundamental Theorem.” In The Adaptive Landscape in Evolutionary Biology, ed. Svensson, Erik I. and Calsbeek, Ryan. New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Frank, Steven A., and Slatkin, Montgomery. 1992. “Fisher’s Fundamental Theorem of Natural Selection.” Trends in Ecology and Evolution 7 (3): 9295..CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Gavrilets, Sergey. 2004. Fitness Landscapes and the Origin of Species. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
Gavrilets, Sergey, and Gravner, Janko. 1997. “Percolation on the Fitness Hypercube and the Evolution of Reproductive Isolation.” Journal of Theoretical Biology 184 (1): 5164..CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Gog, Julia R., and Grenfell, Bryan T. 2002. “Dynamics and Selection of Many-Strain Pathogens.” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the USA 99 (26): 17209–14..CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Gravner, Janko, Pitman, Damien, and Gavrilets, Sergey. 2007. “Percolation on Fitness Landscapes: Effects of Correlation, Phenotype, and Incompatibilities.” Journal of Theoretical Biology 248 (4): 627–45..CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Hamblin, Steven R., White, Peter A., and Tanaka, Mark M. 2014. “Viral Niche Construction Alters Hosts and Ecosystems at Multiple Scales.” Trends in Ecology and Evolution 29 (1): 594–99..CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kaplan, Jonathan. 2008. “The End of the Adaptive Landscape Metaphor?Biology and Philosophy 23 (5): 625–38..CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kauffman, Stuart, and Levin, Simon. 1987. “Towards a General Theory of Adaptive Walks on Rugged Landscapes.” Journal of Theoretical Biology 128 (1): 1145..CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kauffman, Stuart A., and Johnsen, Sonke. 1991. “Coevolution to the Edge of Chaos: Coupled Fitness Landscapes, Poised States, and Coevolutionary Avalanches.” Journal of Theoretical Biology 149 (4): 467505..CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Krakauer, David C., Page, Karen M., and Erwin, Douglas H. 2009. “Diversity, Dilemmas, and Monopolies of Niche Construction.” American Naturalist 173 (1): 2640..CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Laland, Kevin N. 2008. “Exploring Gene-Culture Interactions: Insights from Handedness, Sexual Selection and Niche-Construction Case Studies.” Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London B 363 (1509): 3577–89..Google ScholarPubMed
Lewontin, Richard C. 1963. “Models, Mathematics and Metaphors.” Synthese 15 (1): 222–44..CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lewontin, Richard C. 1978. “Adaptation.” Scientific American 239 (3): 213–30..CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Lewontin, Richard C. 1983. “The Organism as the Subject and Object of Evolution.” Scientia 118:6382.Google Scholar
McNally, Luke, and Brown, Sam P. 2015. “Building the Microbiome in Health and Disease: Niche Construction and Social Conflict in Bacteria.” Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London B 370:1675.Google Scholar
Nahum, Joshua R., Godfrey-Smith, Peter, Harding, Brittany N., Marcus, Joseph H., Carlson-Stevermer, Jared, and Kerr, Benjamin. 2015. “A Tortoise-Hare Pattern Seen in Adapting Structured and Unstructured Populations Suggests a Rugged Fitness Landscape in Bacteria.” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the USA 112 (24): 7530–35..CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Odling-Smee, F. John, Laland, Kevin N., and Feldman, Marcus W. 2003. Niche Construction: The Neglected Process in Evolution. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
Okasha, Samir. 2008. “Fisher’s Fundamental Theorem of Natural Selection: A Philosophical Analysis.” British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 59 (3): 319–51..CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Okasha, Samir. 2010. “Evolution and Directionality: Lessons from Fisher’s Fundamental Theorem.” In EPSA Philosophical Issues in the Sciences, 187–96. Dordrecht: Springer.Google Scholar
Pigliucci, Massimo. 2008. “Sewall Wright’s Adaptive Landscapes: 1932 vs. 1988.” Biology and Philosophy 23 (5): 591603..CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pigliucci, Massimo. 2012. “Landscapes, Surfaces, and Morphospaces: What Are They Good For?” In The Adaptive Landscape in Evolutionary Biology, ed. Svensson, Erik I. and Calsbeek, Ryan, 2638. New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Plutynski, Anya. 2008. “The Rise and Fall of the Adaptive Landscape?Biology and Philosophy 23 (5): 605–23..CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Price, George R. 1972. “Fisher’s ‘Fundamental Theorem’ Made Clear.” Annals of Human Genetics 36 (2): 129–40..CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Provine, William B. 1986. Sewall Wright and Evolutionary Biology. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
Ruse, Michael. 1990. “Are Pictures Really Necessary? The Case of Sewell Wright’s ‘Adaptive Landscapes.’” In PSA 1990: Proceedings of the 1990 Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association, Vol. 2, ed. Fine, Arthur, Forbes, Micky, and Wessels, Linda, 6377. East Lansing, MI: Philosophy of Science Association.Google Scholar
Schwilk, Dylan W. 2003. “Flammability Is a Niche Construction Trait: Canopy Architecture Affects Fire Intensity.” American Naturalist 162 (6): 725–33..CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Schwilk, Dylan W., and Kerr, Benjamin. 2002. “Genetic Niche-Hiking: An Alternative Explanation for the Evolution of Flammability.” Oikos 99 (3): 431–42..CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sella, Guy, and Hirsh, Aaron E. 2005. “The Application of Statistical Physics to Evolutionary Biology.” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the USA 102 (27): 9541–46..CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Siepielski, Adam M., DiBattista, Joseph D., and Carlson, Stephanie M. 2009. “It’s about Time: The Temporal Dynamics of Phenotypic Selection in the Wild.” Ecology Letters 12 (11): 1261–76..CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Skipper, Robert A. Jr. 2004. “The Heuristic Role of Sewall Wright’s 1932 Adaptive Landscape Diagram.” Philosophy of Science 71 (5): 1176–88..CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Skipper, Robert A. Jr., and Dietrich, Michael R. 2012. “Sewall Wright’s Adaptive Landscape: Philosophical Reflections on Heuristic Value.” In The Adaptive Landscape in Evolutionary Biology, ed. Svensson, Erik I. and Calsbeek, Ryan, 1625. New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Svensson, Erik I., and Calsbeek, Ryan. 2012. “The Past, the Present, and the Future of the Adaptive Landscape.” In The Adaptive Landscape in Evolutionary Biology, ed. Svensson, Erik I. and Calsbeek, Ryan, 299308. New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Walsh, Denis M., Lewens, Tim, and Ariew, André. 2002. “The Trials of Life: Natural Selection and Random Drift.” Philosophy of Science 69 (3): 429–46..CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Weinreich, Daniel M., Delaney, Nigel F., DePristo, Mark A., and Hartl, Daniel L. 2006. “Darwinian Evolution Can Follow Only Very Few Mutational Paths to Fitter Proteins.” Science 312 (5770): 111–14..CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Wilkins, Jon F., and Godfrey-Smith, Peter. 2009. “Adaptationism and the Adaptive Landscape.” Biology and Philosophy 24 (2): 199214..CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wrenbeck, Emily E., Azouz, Laura R., and Whitehead, Timothy A. 2017. “Single-Mutation Fitness Landscapes for an Enzyme on Multiple Substrates Reveal Specificity Is Globally Encoded.” Nature Communications 8:15695.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Wright, Sewall. 1932. “The Roles of Mutation, Inbreeding, Crossbreeding, and Selection in Evolution.” Proceedings of the Sixth International Congress of Genetics 1:355–66.Google Scholar
6
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

The Dual Landscape Model of Adaptation and Niche Construction
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

The Dual Landscape Model of Adaptation and Niche Construction
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

The Dual Landscape Model of Adaptation and Niche Construction
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *