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Horizontal Models: From Bakers to Cats

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 January 2022

Abstract

At the center of quantum chaos research is a particular family of models known as quantum maps. These maps illustrate an important “horizontal” dimension to model construction that has been overlooked in the literature on models. Three ways in which quantum maps are being used to clarify the relationship between classical and quantum mechanics are examined. This study suggests that horizontal models may provide a new and fruitful framework for exploring intertheoretic relations.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Philosophy of Science Association

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Footnotes

I would especially like to thank Jim Cushing, Steve Tomsovic, Jon Keating, and an anonymous referee for helpful comments on an earlier draft of this paper.

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