Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-846f6c7c4f-whwnh Total loading time: 0.309 Render date: 2022-07-07T01:40:02.706Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

Scientific/Intellectual Movements Remedying Epistemic Injustice: The Case of Indigenous Studies

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 January 2022

Abstract

Whereas much of the literature in the social epistemology of scientific knowledge has focused either on scientific communities or research groups, we examine the epistemic significance of scientific/intellectual movements (SIMs). We argue that certain types of SIMs can play an important epistemic role in science: they can remedy epistemic injustices in scientific practices. SIMs can counteract epistemic injustices effectively because many forms of epistemic injustice require structural and not merely individual remedies. To illustrate our argument, we discuss the case of indigenous studies.

Type
Ethics, Values, and Social Epistemology
Information
Philosophy of Science , Volume 86 , Issue 5 , December 2019 , pp. 1052 - 1063
Copyright
Copyright © The Philosophy of Science Association

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Footnotes

*

To contact the authors, please write to: Inkeri Koskinen, Tampere University; e-mail: inkeri.koskinen@tuni.fi. Kristina Rolin, Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies; e-mail: kristina.rolin@helsinki.fi.

References

Almassi, B. 2012. “Climate Change, Epistemic Trust, and Expert Trustworthiness.” Ethics and the Environment 17 (2): 2949..CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Andersen, H. 2016. “Collaboration, Interdisciplinarity, and the Epistemology of Contemporary Science.” Studies in History and Philosophy of Science 56:110.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Anderson, E. 2012. “Epistemic Justice as a Virtue of Social Institutions.” Social Epistemology 26 (2): 163–73..CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Coady, D. 2010. “Two Concepts of Epistemic Injustice.” Episteme 7 (2): 101–13..CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Dotson, K. 2011. “Tracking Epistemic Violence, Tracking Practice of Silencing.” Hypatia 26 (2): 236–57..CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Frickel, S., Gibbon, S., Howard, J., Kempner, J., Ottinger, G., and Hess, D. J.. 2010. “Undone Science: Charting Social Movement and Civil Society Challenges to Research Agenda Setting.” Science, Technology and Human Values 35 (4): 444–73..CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Frickel, S., and Gross, N.. 2005. “A General Theory of Scientific/Intellectual Movements.” American Sociological Review 70 (2): 204–32..CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fricker, M. 2007. Epistemic Injustice: Power and the Ethics of Knowing. Oxford: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Garroutte, E.-M. 2003. Real Indians: Identity and the Survival of Native America. Berkeley: University of California Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Grasswick, H. 2010. “Scientific and Lay Communities: Earning Epistemic Trust through Knowledge Sharing.” Synthese 177:387409.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Grasswick, H.. 2017. “Epistemic Injustice in Science.” In The Routledge Handbook of Epistemic Injustice, ed. Kidd, I. J., Medina, J., and Pohlhaus, G., 313–23. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
Hauswald, R. 2015. “Entanglements of Science and Activism: An Epistemological Inquiry.” Unpublished manuscript, presented at the 8th Munich-Sydney-Tilburg (MuST) Conference in Philosophy of Science, June 10–12, Tilburg University.Google Scholar
Hookway, C. 2010. “Some Varieties of Epistemic Injustice: Reflections on Fricker.” Episteme 7 (2): 151–63..CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kitcher, P. 2001. Science, Truth, and Democracy. Oxford: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Koskinen, I. 2015. “Researchers Building Nations: Under What Conditions Can Overtly Political Research Be Objective?” In Recent Developments in the Philosophy of Science: EPSA 13 Helsinki, ed. Mäki, U. et al., 129–39. Dordrecht: Springer.Google Scholar
Longino, H. 2002. The Fate of Knowledge. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Resnik, D. 2000. “A Pragmatic Approach to the Demarcation Problem.” Studies in History and Philosophy of Science A 31 (2): 249–67..Google Scholar
Rolin, K. 2015. “Values in Science: The Case of Scientific Collaboration.” Philosophy of Science 82 (2): 157–77..CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rolin, K.. 2016. “Values, Standpoints, and Scientific/Intellectual Movements.” Studies in History and Philosophy of Science A 56:1119.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Scheman, N. 2001. “Epistemology Resuscitated: Objectivity as Trustworthiness.” In Engendering Rationalities, ed. Tuana, N. and Morgen, S., 2352. Albany, NY: SUNY Press.Google Scholar
Seurujärvi-Kari, I., and Kulonen, U.-M., eds. 1996. Essays on Indigenous Identity and Rights. Helsinki: Helsinki University Press.Google Scholar
Smith, L. T. 1999. Decolonizing Methodologies: Research and Indigenous Peoples. London: Zed.Google Scholar
Stordahl, V. 2008. “Nation Building through Knowledge Building: The Discourse of Sami Higher Education and Research in Norway.” In Indigenous Peoples: Self-Determination, Knowledge, Indigeneity, ed. Minde, H., 249–65. Delft: Eburon.Google Scholar
Tsosie, R. 2017. “Indigenous Peoples, Anthropology, and the Legacy of Epistemic Injustice.” In The Routledge Handbook of Epistemic Injustice, ed. Kidd, I. J., Medina, J., and Pohlhaus, G., 356–69. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
Wagenknecht, S. 2014. “Facing the Incompleteness of Epistemic Trust: Managing Dependence in Scientific Practice.” Social Epistemology 29 (2): 160–84..Google Scholar
Whyte, K. P., Brewer, J. P., and Johnson, J. T.. 2016. “Weaving Indigenous Science, Protocols and Sustainability Science.” Sustainability Science 11:2532.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Whyte, K. P., and Crease, R.. 2010. “Trust, Expertise and the Philosophy of Science.” Synthese 177:411–25.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wilholt, T. 2013. “Epistemic Trust in Science.” British Journal for Philosophy of Science 64:233–53.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wray, K. B. 2007. “Who Has Scientific Knowledge?Social Epistemology 21 (3): 337–47..CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wylie, A. 2015. “A Plurality of Pluralisms: Collaborative Practice in Archaeology.” In Objectivity in Science: New Perspectives from Science and Technology Studies, ed. Padovani, F., Richardson, A., and Tsou, J. Y., 189210. Boston Studies in the Philosophy and History of Science 310. Dordrecht: Springer.Google Scholar
6
Cited by

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Scientific/Intellectual Movements Remedying Epistemic Injustice: The Case of Indigenous Studies
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Scientific/Intellectual Movements Remedying Epistemic Injustice: The Case of Indigenous Studies
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Scientific/Intellectual Movements Remedying Epistemic Injustice: The Case of Indigenous Studies
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *