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Rachel Walker (2011). Vowel patterns in language. (Cambridge Studies in Linguistics 130.) Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Pp. x + 356.

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  13 December 2012

Peter Jurgec
Affiliation:
Meertens Institute, Amsterdam and University of Leiden

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Book Review
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Copyright © Cambridge University Press 2012

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Rachel Walker (2011). Vowel patterns in language. (Cambridge Studies in Linguistics 130.) Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Pp. x + 356.
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Rachel Walker (2011). Vowel patterns in language. (Cambridge Studies in Linguistics 130.) Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Pp. x + 356.
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Rachel Walker (2011). Vowel patterns in language. (Cambridge Studies in Linguistics 130.) Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Pp. x + 356.
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