Skip to main content
×
×
Home

Computational phonology today*

  • Jeffrey Heinz (a1) and William J. Idsardi (a2)
Extract

This thematic issue almost did not happen. One of us (JH) was almost killed two days after the deadline for article submissions. As a pedestrian on a sidewalk minding his own business, he was struck by a car that ran a red light and lost control after a collision. So when we write that we are delighted to be writing this introduction, over one year later, we both really mean it.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Computational phonology today*
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Computational phonology today*
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Computational phonology today*
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
Corresponding author
E-mail: heinz@udel.edu, idsardi@umd.edu.
Footnotes
Hide All
*

We would like to thank the EMTs, doctors and therapists, as well as the many reviewers for this special issue, and especially the editors of Phonology, Ellen Kaisse and Colin Ewen, who provided invaluable advice and assistance over the past year with tremendous grace and humour, in somewhat extraordinary circumstances.

Footnotes
References
Hide All
Beesley, Kenneth R. & Karttunen, Lauri (2003). Finite state morphology. Stanford: CSLI.
Chandlee, Jane (2014). Strictly local phonological processes. PhD dissertation, University of Delaware.
Daland, Robert (2014). What is computational phonology? Loquens 1. doi.org/10.3989/loquens.2014.004.
Eisner, Jason (1997). Efficient generation in primitive Optimality Theory. In Proceedings of the 35th Annual Meeting of the ACL and 8th Conference of the European Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics. Morristown, NJ: Association for Computational Linguistics. 313–320.
Gallagher, Gillian, Graff, Peter, Kawahara, Shigeto & Kenstowicz, Michael (eds.) (2012). Phonological similarity. Special issue. Lingua 122. 107176.
Garey, Michael R. & Johnson, David S. (1979). Computers and intractability: a guide to the theory of NP-completeness. New York: Freeman.
Gold, E. M. (1967). Language identification in the limit. Information and Control 10. 447474.
Goldwater, Sharon & Johnson, Mark (2003). Learning OT constraint rankings using a Maximum Entropy model. In Spenader, Jennifer, Eriksson, Anders & Dahl, Östen (eds.) Proceedings of the Stockholm Workshop on Variation within Optimality Theory. Stockholm: Stockholm University. 111120.
Hayes, Bruce & Wilson, Colin (2008). A maximum entropy model of phonotactics and phonotactic learning. LI 39. 379440.
Heinz, Jeffrey (to appear). The computational nature of phonological generalizations. In Hyman, Larry M. & Plank, Frans (eds.) Phonological typology. Berlin & New York: Mouton de Gruyter.
Heinz, Jeffrey, Kobele, Gregory M. & Riggle, Jason (2009). Evaluating the complexity of Optimality Theory. LI 40. 277288.
Hulden, Mans (2009). Foma: a finite-state compiler and library. In Proceedings of the 12th Conference of the European Chapter of the Association for Computational Linguistics: demonstrations session. Association for Computational Linguistics. 29–32.
Hyman, Larry M. (1975). Phonology: theory and analysis. New York: Holt, Rinehart & Winston.
Idsardi, William J. (2006). A simple proof that Optimality Theory is computationally intractable. LI 37. 271275.
Jardine, Adam (2016). Locality and non-linear representations in tonal phonology. PhD thesis, University of Delaware.
Kaplan, Ronald & Kay, Martin (1994). Regular models of phonological rule systems. Computational Linguistics 20. 331378.
Lau, Jey Han, Clark, Alexander & Lappin, Shalom (2016). Grammaticality, acceptability, and probability: a probabilistic view of linguistic knowledge. Cognitive Science. doi.org/10.1111/cogs.12414.
Niyogi, Partha (2006). The computational nature of language learning and evolution. Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press.
Rogers, James (1998). A descriptive approach to language-theoretic complexity. Stanford: CSLI.
Rogers, James & Pullum, Geoffrey K. (2011). Aural pattern recognition experiments and the subregular hierarchy. Journal of Logic, Language and Information 20. 329342.
Savitch, Walter J. (1993). Why it might pay to assume that languages are infinite. Annals of Mathematics and Artificial Intelligence 8. 1725.
Stabler, Edward (2014). Towards a rationalist theory of language acquisition. Journal of Machine Learning Research: Workshop and Conference Proceedings 34. 2132.
Tesar, Bruce & Smolensky, Paul (2000). Learnability in Optimality Theory. Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press.
Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

Phonology
  • ISSN: 0952-6757
  • EISSN: 1469-8188
  • URL: /core/journals/phonology
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 61
Total number of PDF views: 450 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 815 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between 14th August 2017 - 18th June 2018. This data will be updated every 24 hours.