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Linking Women's Descriptive and Substantive Representation in the United States

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  25 November 2009

Kimberly Cowell-Meyers
Affiliation:
American University
Laura Langbein
Affiliation:
American University

Abstract

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Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Women and Politics Research Section of the American Political Science Association 2009

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