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Design for Extremes: A Contour Method for Defining Requirements Based on Multivariate Extremes

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 July 2019

Andreas F. Haselsteiner
Affiliation:
University of Bremen, Germany;
Rafael Reisenhofer
Affiliation:
University of Vienna, Austria
Jan-Hendrik Ohlendorf
Affiliation:
University of Bremen, Germany;
Klaus-Dieter Thoben
Affiliation:
University of Bremen, Germany;
Corresponding

Abstract

The design of various products is driven by requirements that describe extremes. In marine structural design, joint extremes of environmental variables like wave height and wind speed are used to define load cases. Similarly, in ergonomic design minimum and maximum values of anthropometric variables are considered to make sure a product is suitable for a wide range of users. Here, we present a method that supports designers to define requirements using joint extreme values: the requirements contour method. The method is based on structural engineering's environmental contour method and uses a dataset and statistical methods to specify a region in the variable space that must be considered in the design process. That region's enclosure is the requirements contour and holds the joint extremes. After formally describing the method, we give an illustrative example of its usage: we use it to define requirements for the design of an ergonomic handle for a power tool. The requirements contour method is a field-independent approach to design for extremes. In the tradition of design for X, we think that a design project can benefit from applying methods that focus on different 'X's.

Type
Article
Creative Commons
Creative Common License - CCCreative Common License - BYCreative Common License - NCCreative Common License - ND
This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives licence (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is unaltered and is properly cited. The written permission of Cambridge University Press must be obtained for commercial re-use or in order to create a derivative work.
Copyright
© The Author(s) 2019

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