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A genetic dissection of the retinoid signalling pathway in the mouse

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 February 2007

Manuel Mark
Affiliation:
Institut de Génétique et de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire, BP 163, 67404 Illkirch Cedex, C.U. de Strasbourg, France
Norbert B. Ghyselinck
Affiliation:
Institut de Génétique et de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire, BP 163, 67404 Illkirch Cedex, C.U. de Strasbourg, France
Olivia Wendling
Affiliation:
Institut de Génétique et de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire, BP 163, 67404 Illkirch Cedex, C.U. de Strasbourg, France
Valérie Dupé
Affiliation:
Institut de Génétique et de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire, BP 163, 67404 Illkirch Cedex, C.U. de Strasbourg, France
Bénédicte Mascrez
Affiliation:
Institut de Génétique et de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire, BP 163, 67404 Illkirch Cedex, C.U. de Strasbourg, France
Philippe Kastner
Affiliation:
Institut de Génétique et de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire, BP 163, 67404 Illkirch Cedex, C.U. de Strasbourg, France
Pierre Chambon*
Affiliation:
Institut de Génétique et de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire, BP 163, 67404 Illkirch Cedex, C.U. de Strasbourg, France
*
*Corresponding Author: Professor Pierre Chambon, fax +33 38865 3203, email chambon@igbmc.u-strasbg.fr
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Abstract

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To determine the functions of retinoic acid receptors RAR and RXR, we have systematically knocked-out their genes by homologous recombination in the embryonic stem cells and generated null-mutant mice. This approach has allowed us to perform a genetic dissection of the retinoic acid signalling pathway.

Type
Symposium on ‘Functionality of nutrients and gene expression’
Copyright
Copyright © The Nutrition Society 1999

References

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