Skip to main content
×
Home

Is vitamin A consumption a risk factor for osteoporotic fracture?

  • Margo E. Barker (a1) and Aubrey Blumsohn (a1)
Abstract

Severe vitamin A toxicity is known to have adverse effects on skeletal health. Studies involving animal models and case reports have documented that hypervitaminosis A is associated with bone resorption, hypercalcaemia and bone abnormalities. More recently, some epidemiological studies have suggested that high habitual intake of vitamin A could contribute to low bone mineral content and fracture risk. The evidence relating to the possible deleterious role of vitamin A in bone health is of variable quality and is potentially confounded by collinearity of nutrient intake and difficulties in assessing vitamin A exposure. Furthermore, because intake of vitamin A varies between studies it is not possible to define an intake threshold associated with harm.

    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Is vitamin A consumption a risk factor for osteoporotic fracture?
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Is vitamin A consumption a risk factor for osteoporotic fracture?
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Is vitamin A consumption a risk factor for osteoporotic fracture?
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
Corresponding author
*Corresponding author: Dr Margo E. Barker, fax +44 114 261 0112, m.e.barker@sheffield.ac.uk
References
Hide All
Anderson JJB (2002) Oversupplementation of vitamin A and osteoporotic fractures in the elderly: To supplement or not to supplement with vitamin A. Journal of Bone and Mineral Research 17, 13591362.
Ballew C, Galuska D & Gillespie C (2001) High serum retinyl esters are not associated with reduced bone mineral density in the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 1988–1994. Journal of Bone and Mineral Research 16, 23062312.
Bendich A & Langseth L (1989) Safety of vitamin A. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 49, 358371.
Clarke I & Bassett AL (1962) The amelioration of hypervitaminosis D in rats with vitamin A. Journal of Experimental Medicine 115, 147155.
Dawson-Hughes B (2003) Interaction of dietary calcium and protein in bone health in humans. Journal of Nutrition 133, 852S854S.
Denke MD (2002) Dietary retinol – a double-edged sword. Journal of the American Medical Association 287, 102104.
Department of Health (1991) Dietary Reference Values for Food Energy and Nutrients for the United Kingdom. Report on Health and Social Subjects no. 41. London: H.M. Stationery Office.
Feskanich D, Singh V, Willett WC & Colditz GA (2002) Vitamin A intake and hip fractures among postmenopausal women. Journal of the American Medical Association 287, 4754.
Frame B, Jackson CE, Reynolds WA & Umphrey JE (1974) Hypercalcemia and skeletal effects in chronic hypervitaminosis A. Annals of Internal Medicine 80, 4448.
Frankel TL, Seshadri MS, McDowall DB & Cornish CJ (1986) Hypervitaminosis A and calcium-regulating hormones in the rat. Journal of Nutrition 116, 578587.
Goodman AB (1995) Chromosomal locations and modes of action of genes of the retinoid (vitamin A) system support their involvement in the etiology of schizophrenia. American Journal of Medical Genetics 60, 335348.
Gregory J, Foster K, Tyler H & Wiseman M (1990) The Dietary and Nutritional Survey of British Adults. London: H.M. Stationery Office.
Harrington M & Cashman KD (2003) High salt intake appears to increase bone resorption in postmenopausal women but high potassium intake ameliorates this adverse effect. Nutrition Reviews 61, 179163.
Hough S, Avioli LV, Muir H, Gelderblom D, Jenkins G, Kurasi H, Slatopolsky E, Bergfeld MA & Teitelbaum SL (1988) Effects of hypervitaminosis A on the bone and mineral metabolism of the rat. Endocrinology 122, 29332966.
Hulshof P, Brouwer JT, Burema J & West CE (2002) Bias and random error in retinol measurements of laboratories in countries with populations with mild to severe vitamin A deficiency. Clinical Chemistry 48, 20612063.
Institute of Medicine (2000) Dietary Reference Intakes for Vitamin A, Vitamin K, Arsenic, Boron, Chromium, Copper, Iodine, Iron, Manganese, Molybdenum, Nickel, Silicon, Vanadium, and Zinc. >Washington DC: National Academy Press.
Johansson S & Melhus H (2001) Vitamin A antagonizes calcium response to vitamin D in man. Journal of Bone and Mineral Research 16, 18991905.
Kawahara TN, Krueger DC, Engelke JA, Harke JM & Binkley NC (2002) Short-term vitamin A supplementation does not affect bone turnover in men. Journal of Nutrition 132, 11691172.
Melhus H, Michaelsson K, Kindmark A, Bergstrom R, Holmberg L, Mallmin H, Wolk A & Ljunghall S (1998) Excessive dietary intake of vitamin A is associated with reduced bone mineral density and increased risk of hip fracture. Annals of Internal Medicine 129, 770778.
Metz AL, Walser MM & Olson WG (1985) The interaction of dietary vitamin A and vitamin D related to skeletal development in the turkey poult. Journal of Nutrition 115, 929935.
Michaelsson MD, Lithell H, Vessby B & Melhus H (2003) Serum retinol levels and risk of fracture. New England Journal of Medicine 348, 287294.
Milstone LM & Leachman SA (2001) Do retinoids cause osteoporosis? In Nutritional Aspects of Osteoporosis, pp. 285293 [Burckhardt P, Dawson-Hughes B and Heaney RP, editors]. New York: Academic Press.
Moore T & Sharman IM (1979) Hypervitaminosis A combined with calcium deficiency in rats. International Journal of Vitamin and Nutrition Research 49, 1420.
Promislow JHE, Goodman-Gruen D, Slymen DJ & Barrett-Connor E (2002) Retinol intake and bone mineral density in the elderly: the Rancho Bernardo Study. Journal of Bone and Mineral Research 17, 13491358.
Rohde CM & DeLuca H (2003) Bone resorption activity of all-trans retinoic acid is independent of vitamin D in rats. Journal of Nutrition 133, 777783.
Rohde CM, Puno CWE, Manatt M, Clagett-Dame M & Deluca HF (1999) Vitamin A antagonises the action of vitamin D in rats. Journal of Nutrition 129, 22462250.
Sigurdsson G, Franzson L, Thorgeirsdottir H & Steingrimsdottir L (2001) A lack of association between excessive dietary intake of vitamin A and bone mineral density in seventy-year-old Icelandic women. In Nutritional Aspects of Osteoporosis, pp. 295302 [Burckhardt P, Dawson-Hughes B and Heaney RP, editors]. New York: Academic Press.
Smith FR & Goodman DS (1976) Vitamin A transport in human vitamin A toxicity. New England Journal of Medicine 294, 805808.
Sowers MF & Wallace RB (1990) Retinol, supplemental vitamin A and bone status. Journal of Clinical Epidemiology 43, 693699.
Stephensen CB & Gildengorin G (2000) Serum retinol, the acute phase response, and the apparent misclassification of vitamin A status in the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. American Journal oj'Clinical Nutrition 72, 11701178.
West CE, Eilander A & Van Lieshout M (2002) Consequences of revised estimates of carotenoid bioefficacy for dietary control of vitamin A deficiency in developing countries. Journal of Nutrition 132, 2920S2926S.
Willett W (1998) Nutritional Epidemiology, 2nd ed. New York: Oxford University Press.
Willett WC, Stampfer MJ, Underwood BA, Taylor JO & Hennekens CH (1983) Vitamins A, E, and carotene: Effects of supplementation on their plasma levels. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 38, 559566.
Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

Proceedings of the Nutrition Society
  • ISSN: 0029-6651
  • EISSN: 1475-2719
  • URL: /core/journals/proceedings-of-the-nutrition-society
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Keywords:

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 1
Total number of PDF views: 88 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 206 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 21st November 2017. This data will be updated every 24 hours.