Skip to main content
×
Home
    • Aa
    • Aa

Optimal nutrition: fibre and phytochemicals

  • Ian Rowland (a1)
Abstract

There is currently intense research interest in secondary plant metabolites because of their potential preventative effects on the chronic diseases of Western societies, especially cardiovascular disease and cancer. To date most of the research has focused on the identification of plant-derived substances and their potential protective effects against specific chronic diseases. The important issue of determining the optimal intake of those substances, such that the beneficial effects are maximized without manifestation of adverse effects, has yet to be addressed in most cases. Furthermore, there are no specific functional markers that can be used to assess optimal intake, although it may be possible to use biomarkers such as serum cholesterol if the rest of the diet is strictly controlled. The present review discusses a wide range of substances associated with plants, including dietary fibre, resistant starch, oligosaccharides, phyto-oestrogens, phytosterols, flavonoids, terpenes and isothiocyanates, and attempts where possible to indicate optimal intakes and to suggest functional markers.

    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Optimal nutrition: fibre and phytochemicals
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Optimal nutrition: fibre and phytochemicals
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Optimal nutrition: fibre and phytochemicals
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
Corresponding author
Corresponding author: Professor Ian Rowland, fax + 44 (0)1265 323023, email i.rowland@ulst.ac.uk
References
Hide All
Adlercreutz H (1995) Phytoestrogens: Epidemiology and possible role in cancer protection. Environmental Health Perspectives 103, Suppl. 7, 103112.
American Institute for Cancer Research (editors) (1998) Dietary Phytochemicals in Cancer Prevention and Treatment. Advances in Experimental Biology and Medicine, vol. 401. New York: Plenum Press.
Arora A, Nair MG & Strasburg GM (1998) Antioxidant activities of isoflavones and their biological metabolites in a liposomal system. Archives of Biochemistry and Biophysics 356, 133141.
Bingham SA, Atkinson C, Liggins J, Bluck L & Coward A (1998) Phyto-oestrogens: where are we now? British Journal of Nutrition 79, 393406.
Bowey EA, Rowland IR, Adlercreutz H, Sanders TAB & Wiseman H (1998) Interindividual variation in soya isoflavone metabolism: the role of habitual diet. Proceedings of the Nutrition Society 58, 000A.
Cromwell PL, Siar Ayoubi A & Burke YD (199) Antitumorigenic effects of limonene and perillyl alcohol against pancreatic and breast cancer. In Dietary Phytochemicals in Cancer Prevention and Treatment. Advances in Experimental Biology and Medicine, vol. 401, pp. 131136[American Institute for Cancer Research, editors]. New York: Plenum Press.
Gibson GR, Beatty ER, Wang X & Cummings JH (1995) Selective stimulation of Bifidobacteria in the human colon by oligofructose and inulin. Gastroenterology 108, 975982.
Hecht SS (1995) Chemoprevention by isothiocyanates. Journal of Cellular Biochemistry 22, Suppl., 195209.
Hohl RJ (1996) Monoterpenes as regulators of malignant cell proliferation. In Dietary Phytochemicals in Cancer Prevention and Treatment. Advances in Experimental Biology and Medicine, vol. 401, pp. 137146[American Institute for Cancer Research, editors]. New York: Plenum Press.
Markiewicz L, Garey J, Aldercreutz H & Gurpide E (1993) In vitro bioassays of non-steroidal phytoestrogens. Journal of Steroid Biochemistry 45, 399405.
Miettinen TA, Puska P, Gylling H, Vanhanen H & Vartiainen E (1995) Reduction in serum cholesterol with sitostanol-ester margarine in a mildly hypercholesterolemic population. New England Journal of Medicine 16, 13081312.
Milligan SR, Balasubramanian AV & Kalita JC (1998) Relative potency of xenobiotic estrogens in an acute in vivo mammalian assay. Environmental Health Perspective 106, 2326.
Omenn GS, Goodman G, Thornquist M, Grizzle J, Rosenstock L, Barnhart S, Balmes J, Cherniack MG, Cullen MR, Glass A, Keogh J, Meyskens F, Valanis B & Williams J (1994) The beta carotene and retinol efficacy trial (CARET) for chemoprevention of lung cancer in high risk populations: smokers and asbestos-exposed workers. Cancer Research 54, 2038s2043s.
Reilly J, Dean TS, Rowland I, Sanders TAB & Wiseman H (1999) The influence of dietary isoflavones on markers of lipid peroxidation in healthy male and female volunteers. Proceedings of the Nutrition Society 58 (In the Press).
Reinli K & Block G (1996) Phytoestrogen content of foods – a compendium of literature values. Nutrition and Cancer 26, 123148.
Rowe PM (1996) Beta carotene takes a collective beating. Lancet 347, 249.
Sathyamoorthy N & Wang TTY (1997) Differential effects of dietary phyto-oestrogens daidzein and equol on human breast cancer MCF-7 cells. European Journal of Cancer 33, 23842389.
Steinmetz KA & Potter JD (1991) Vegetables, fruit and cancer. Epidemiology Cancer Causes and Control 2, 325357.
Thompson LU, Robb P, Serraino M & Cheung F (1991) Mammalian lignan production from various foods. Nutrition and Cancer 16, 4352.
Watzl B & Leitzman C (1995) Bioaktive Substanzen in Lebenmitteln (Bioactive Substances in Foods). Stuttgart, Germany: Hippokrates Verlag.
Woteki CE (1995) Consumption, intake patterns, and exposure. Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition 35, 143147.
Zava DT & Duwe G (1998) Estrogenic and antiproliferative properties of genistein and other flavonoids in human breast cancer cells in vitro. Nutrition and Cancer 27, 3140.
Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

Proceedings of the Nutrition Society
  • ISSN: 0029-6651
  • EISSN: 1475-2719
  • URL: /core/journals/proceedings-of-the-nutrition-society
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Keywords:

Metrics

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 0
Total number of PDF views: 76 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 71 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 19th October 2017. This data will be updated every 24 hours.