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Traditional dietary adjuncts for the treatment of diabetes mellitus

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 February 2007

Sara K. Swanston-Flatt
Affiliation:
Biomedical Sciences Research Centre and Department of Biological and Biomedical Sciences, University of Ulster, Coleraine BT52 1SA
Peter R. Flatt
Affiliation:
Biomedical Sciences Research Centre and Department of Biological and Biomedical Sciences, University of Ulster, Coleraine BT52 1SA
Caroline Day
Affiliation:
Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Aston University, Birmingham B4 7ET
Clifford J Bailey
Affiliation:
Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Aston University, Birmingham B4 7ET
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Abstract

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Type
Meeting Report
Copyright
Copyright © The Nutrition Society 1991

References

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