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Use of endogenous carbohydrate and fat as fuels during exercise

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 February 2007

Wade H. Martin III
Affiliation:
Department of Internal Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri 631 10, USA
Samuel Klein*
Affiliation:
Department of Internal Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri 631 10, USA
*
*Corresponding author: Dr Samuel Klein, fax +1 314-362-8188
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Abstract

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Type
Meeting Report
Copyright
Copyright © The Nutrition Society 1998

References

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