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Incorporating Space in Multimethod Research: Combining Spatial Analysis with Case-Study Research

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 October 2017

Imke Harbers
Affiliation:
University of Amsterdam
Matthew C. Ingram
Affiliation:
University at Albany, SUNY
Corresponding

Abstract

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Type
Symposium: The Road Less Traveled: An Agenda for Mixed-Methods Research
Copyright
Copyright © American Political Science Association 2017 

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References

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