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Mismatch: University Education and Labor Market Institutions

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 March 2017

Ben Ansell
Affiliation:
University of Oxford
Jane Gingrich
Affiliation:
University of Oxford

Abstract

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Type
Symposium: Higher Education in the Knowledge Economy: Politics and Policies of Transformation
Copyright
Copyright © American Political Science Association 2017 

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References

REFERENCES

Ansell, Ben and Gingrich, Jane. 2013. “A Tale of Two Trilemmas: Varieties of Higher Education and the Service Economy”. In The Political Economy of the Service Transition, ed. Wren, Anne. Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Ansell, Ben and Gingrich, Jane. 2017. “Skills in Demand?” In Political Competition and Voter/Party Alignment in Times of Welfare State Transformation, ed. Manow, Philip, Palier, Bruno and Schwander, Hanna. Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Breen, Richard and Jonsson, Jan O. 2005. “Inequality of Opportunity in Comparative Perspective: Recent Research on Educational Attainment and Social Mobility.” Annual Review of Sociology 31: 223243.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Busemeyer, Marius R. 2014. Skills and Inequality: Partisan Politics and the Political Economy of Education Reforms in Western Welfare States. Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Goos, Maarten, Manning, Alan and Salomons, Anna. 2009. “Job Polarization in Europe.” American Economic Review 99 (2): 5863.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Häusermann, Silja and Schwander, Hanna. 2012. “Varieties of Dualization? Labor Market Segmentation and Insider Outsider Divides Across Regimes.” In The Age of Dualization: The Changing Face of Inequality in Deindustrializing Societies, ed. Emmenegger, Patrick, Häusermann, Silja, Palier, Bruno and Seelib-Kaiser, Martin.Google Scholar
Häusermann, Silja, Kurer, Thomas, and Schwander, Hanna. 2015. “High-skilled Outsiders? Labor Market Vulnerability, Education and Welfare State Preferences.” Socio-Economic Review 13 (2): 235–58.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Iversen, Torben and Wren, Anne. 1998. “Equality, Employment, and Budgetary Restraint: The Trilemma of the Service Economy.” World Politics 50 (4): 507546.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rehm, Philipp. 2011. “Social Policy by Popular Demand.” World Politics 63 (2): 271–99.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rueda, David. 2007. Social Democracy Inside Out: Partisanship and Labor Market Policy in Advanced Industrialized Democracies. Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Shavit, Yossi, Arum, Richard and Gamoran, Adam. 2007. Stratification in Higher Education: A Comparative Study. Stanford University Press.Google Scholar
Trow, Martin. 1973. Problems in the Transition from Elite to Mass Higher Education. Technical Report University of California, Berkeley.
Wallerstein, Michael. 1999. “Wage-setting Institutions and Pay Inequality in Advanced Industrial Societies.” American Journal of Political Science 43 (3): 649–80.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Walter, Stefanie. 2010. “Globalization and the Welfare State: Testing the Microfoundations of the Compensation Hypothesis.” International Studies Quarterly 54 (2): 403–26.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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