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Navigating Fieldwork as an Outsider: Observations from Interviewing Police Officers in China

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 April 2014

Suzanne E. Scoggins*
Affiliation:
University of California, Berkeley

Abstract

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Type
Symposium: Fieldwork in Political Science: Encountering Challenges and Crafting Solutions
Copyright
Copyright © American Political Science Association 2014 

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References

REFERENCES

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