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Professional Conferences and the Challenges of Studying Black Politics

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 April 2015

Nikol G. Alexander-Floyd
Affiliation:
Rutgers University
Byron D’Andra Orey
Affiliation:
Jackson State University
Khalilah Brown-Dean
Affiliation:
Quinnipiac University

Abstract

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Type
Profession Symposium: Reinventing the Scholarly Conference: Reflections from the Field
Copyright
Copyright © American Political Science Association 2015 

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References

Alexander-Floyd, Nikol G. 2014. “Why Political Scientists Don’t Study Black Women, but Historians and Sociologists Do: On Intersectionality and the Remapping of the Study of Black Political Women.” National Political Science Review 16: 118.Google Scholar
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