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Replication, Replication

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 September 2013

Gary King
Affiliation:
Harvard University

Extract

Political science is a community enterprise; the community of empirical political scientists needs access to the body of data necessary to replicate existing studies to understand, evaluate, and especially build on this work. Unfortunately, the norms we have in place now do not encourage, or in some cases even permit, this aim. Following are suggestions that would facilitate replication and are easy to implement—by teachers, students, dissertation writers, graduate programs, authors, reviewers, funding agencies, and journal and book editors.

Type
Verification/Replication
Copyright
Copyright © The American Political Science Association 1995

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References

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