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Balance Is a Fallacy: Striving for and Supporting a Life with Integrity

  • Renée A. Cramer (a1), Nikol G. Alexander-Floyd (a2) and Taneisha Means (a3)
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References
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Flaherty, Colleen. 2018. “Dancing Backwards in High Heels.” Inside Higher Ed, January 10.
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Gluckman, Nell. 2017. “How a Dean Got over Imposter Syndrome—and Thinks You Can, Too.” Chronicle of Higher Education, November 26.
Gutierrez y Muhs, Gabriella, Niemann, Yolanda Flores, Gonzalez, Carmen G., and Harris, Angela P. (eds.). 2012. Presumed Incompetent: The Intersections of Race and Class for Women in Academia. Boulder: University Press of Colorado.
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Wallace, Michelle. 1994/1978. Black Macho and the Myth of the Superwoman. New York: The Dial Press, 1978. Reprint, with new introduction and bibliography, New York: Verso Press, 1994.
Wilk, Kelly E. 2014. “Work–Life Balance Also Challenges Administrators.” Women in Higher Education 22 (10): 2021.
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PS: Political Science & Politics
  • ISSN: 1049-0965
  • EISSN: 1537-5935
  • URL: /core/journals/ps-political-science-and-politics
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