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Blogging Identities on Israel/Palestine: Public Intellectuals and Their Audiences

  • Mira Sucharov (a1) and Brent E. Sasley (a2)
Abstract
Abstract

Drawing on our research and blogging on Israel and the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, we make three claims about the role of scholar-bloggers in the social media age. First, as scholar-bloggers with some degree of ethno-national attachments related to our area of expertise, we contend that we are well positioned to issue the kinds of critiques that may resonate more deeply due to the very subjectivity that some perceive as a liability. Second, through the melding of scholarly arguments with popular writing forms, scholar-bloggers are uniquely poised to be at the forefront of public engagement and political literacy both with social media publics and with students. Third, the subjectivity hazard is an intrinsic part of any type of research and writing, whether that writing is aimed at a scholarly audience or any other, and should not be used as an argument against academic involvement in social media. Ultimately, subjectivities of both consumers and producers can evolve through these highly interactive media, a dynamic that deserves further examination.

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This list contains references from the content that can be linked to their source. For a full set of references and notes please see the PDF or HTML where available.

Angel Adams Parham . 2005. “Internet, Place, and Public Sphere in Diaspora Communities.” Diaspora 14 (2-3): 349–80.

Pinar Bilgin . 2008. “Thinking Past ‘Western’ IR?Third World Quarterly 29 (1): 512.

Neil Caplan , Wendy Pearlman , Brent Sasley , and Mira Sucharov . 2012. “History, Rationality, Narrative, Imagery: A Four-Way Conversation on Teaching the Arab-Israeli Conflict.” Journal of Political Science Education 8 (3): 288302.

Charli Carpenter , and Daniel W. Drezner . 2010. “International Relations 2.0: The Implications of New Media for an Old Profession.” International Studies Perspectives 11 (3): 255–72.

Anatoliy Gruzd , Barry Wellman , and Yuri Takhteyev . 2011. “Imagining Twitter as an Imagined Community.” American Behavioral Scientist 55 (10): 1294–318.

Maia Hallward . 2010. “International Relations Scholarship, Academic Institutions and the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict.” Cambridge Review of International Affairs 23 (2): 259–80.

Alice Marwick , and danah boyd . 2011. “I Tweet Honestly, I Tweet Passionately: Twitter Users, Context, Collapse, and the Imagined Audience.” New Media & Society 13 (1): 114–33.

Karen McCullagh . 2008. “Blogging: Self Presentation and Privacy.” Information & Communications Technology Law 17 (1): 323.

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PS: Political Science & Politics
  • ISSN: 1049-0965
  • EISSN: 1537-5935
  • URL: /core/journals/ps-political-science-and-politics
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