Skip to main content
×
Home

Blogging in the Political Science Classroom

  • Christopher N. Lawrence (a1) and Michelle L. Dion (a2)
Abstract
Abstract

Weblogs (or blogs), as a form of communication on the Internet, have recently risen in prominence but may be poorly understood by both faculty and students. This article explains how blogs differ from other online communication tools and how political science faculty can make use of blogs in their classes. The focus is on using blogs as part of class assignments to reinforce important skills, including critical thinking, political engagement, and essay writing. We also discuss existing academic and professional blogs that may be models for student blogging in political science.

  • View HTML
    • Send article to Kindle

      To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

      Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

      Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

      Blogging in the Political Science Classroom
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Dropbox

      To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

      Blogging in the Political Science Classroom
      Available formats
      ×
      Send article to Google Drive

      To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

      Blogging in the Political Science Classroom
      Available formats
      ×
Copyright
References
Hide All
Bryant Todd. 2006. “Social Software in Academia.” Educause Quarterly 29 (2): 6164.
Drezner Daniel W., and Farrell Henry. 2008a. “Introduction: Blogs, Politics, and Power: A Special Issue of Public Choice.” Public Choice 134 (1-2): 113.
Drezner Daniel W., and Farrell Henry. 2008b. “The Power and Politics of Blogs.” Public Choice 134 (1-2): 1530.
McKenna Laura, and Pole Antoinette. 2008. “What Do Bloggers Do? An Average Day on an Average Political Blog.” Public Choice 134 (1-2): 97108.
Richardson Will. 2006. Blogs, Wikis, Podcasts, and Other Powerful Web Tools for Classrooms. Thousand Oaks, CA.: Corwin Press.
Xie Ying, Ke Fengfeng, and Sharma Priya. 2008. “The Effect of Peer Feedback for Blogging on College Students' Reflective Learning Processes.” Internet and Higher Education 11: 1825.
Recommend this journal

Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this journal to your organisation's collection.

PS: Political Science & Politics
  • ISSN: 1049-0965
  • EISSN: 1537-5935
  • URL: /core/journals/ps-political-science-and-politics
Please enter your name
Please enter a valid email address
Who would you like to send this to? *
×

Metrics

Altmetric attention score

Full text views

Total number of HTML views: 12
Total number of PDF views: 59 *
Loading metrics...

Abstract views

Total abstract views: 166 *
Loading metrics...

* Views captured on Cambridge Core between September 2016 - 24th November 2017. This data will be updated every 24 hours.